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Articles of Interest

The metaphor was inevitable.
McCain is considered a warrior. But is that the right metaphor for his struggle with cancer?
STAT

2018

Agency seeks more information from companies as it continues to pursue its Youth Tobacco Prevention Plan amid evidence of sharply rising e-cigarette use among kids

Azar, Alex M. and Scott Gottlieb. "We cannot let e-cigarettes become an on-ramp for teenage addiction." Washington Post, October 11, 2018.

At the Department of Health and Human Services, we are deeply concerned about the risks that e-cigarettes pose for children, given how quickly teenage use of these products has accelerated. Using a small battery to heat a liquid that contains nicotine, e-cigarettes turn the liquid into an inhalable vapor. Since 2014, they have been the most popular nicotine product among American teenagers.

Anna Edney and Olivia Zaleski. "Juul in FDA's Sights as U.S. Rethinks Position on E-Cigarettes." Bloomberg, October 2, 2018.

U.S. public health officials are changing their stance on the upstart e-cigarette industry.

Berman, Jae. "Want to live a longer life? Research says you should do these five things.." The Washington Post, August 21, 2018.

There seems to always be a mad dash toward the next new thing when it comes to nutrition and fitness — whether it’s the latest exercise craze, superfood or diet regimen. But leaping from fad to fad isn’t exactly a well-reasoned strategy for improving our health. Nor is it a way to create changes that stick — which are the only ones that will have an impact.

If we’re going to generate enough motivation to create sustainable change, we need to have clear objectives and understand how and why our habits fulfill those objectives. That way, when relapses or difficult moments arise — and they always do — our deeper motivation and plan keep us anchored.

If your objective is to live a longer, healthier life, a new study conducted by Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health lays out five practices, none of which needs to involve a fad.

FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD, declared teen use of electronic cigarettes an "epidemic" and said the agency would be addressing the issue with "the largest coordinated tobacco compliance effort in FDA's history."

Actions being considered -- but not yet undertaken -- include the immediate removal of certain flavored e-cigarettes from the market and shortening the time to market review for most cigarettes now being sold.

Joseph, Andrew. "Seven U.S. states now have adult obesity rates of 35 percent or higher." STAT, September 12, 2018.

In its report, the CDC called for a comprehensive strategy to reduce obesity prevalence, with steps including healthy eating, better sleep, stress management, and physical activity.

"How Firms Can Convince Employees to Quit Smoking." The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, August 28, 2018.

Wellness programs are increasing in popularity as companies grow more determined to curb the soaring costs of providing health insurance for employees. To encourage healthy behaviors, firms are offering everything from free yoga classes to weight-loss support groups. While there have been some positive results from these programs, smoking cessation remains a particular challenge. But a recent study by two University of Pennsylvania experts found that cash can be a powerful incentive to help smokers quit. 

Jayne O'Donnell, Ken Alltucker and Josephine Chu. "Teens hooked by vaping: FDA weighing a ban on flavored e-cigarette liquids." USA Today, August 13, 2018.

Teen vaping is reaching epidemic levels and FDA is considering regulation to curb it. One proposal would be banning flavoring of e-cigarette liquids. USA TODAY

"E-cigarettes may help adults quit but get teens hooked." Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, August 10, 2018.

Makers of e-cigarettes say their products could save lives by helping adult smokers quit traditional cigarettes. But critics say that the electronic devices, which deliver nicotine via a heated aerosol and come in fruit flavors, are being marketed to teens and could put young people on the path to nicotine addiction.

"4 marketing tactics e-cigarette companies use to target youth." The Truth Initiative, August 9, 2018.

From introducing appealing flavors to offering college scholarships, manufacturers and sellers of e-cigarettes aggressively target young people.

Selig, Roni; Maddie Bender and Davide Cannaviccio. "Juul and the vape debate: Choosing between smokers and teens." CNN Health, August 9, 2018.

The teen vaping epidemic has made its mark in high schools.

To mark World Lung Cancer Day on August 1st, Cancer Network spoke with Dr. Alan Blum, Professor and Gerald Leon Wallace, MD, Endowed Chair of Family Medicine at the University of Alabama School of Medicine, where he also directs the University’s Center for the Study of Tobacco and Society, which he founded in 1999. Dr. Blum is an expert on the history of tobacco use, tobacco industry marketing, and the anti-smoking movement. He is a renowned pioneer in creative physician-led public advocacy initiatives to counter the promotion of unhealthy products and lethal lifestyles. 

—Interviewed by Anna Azvolinsky

Santhanam, Laura. "Why aren’t more Americans getting screened for these cancers?." PBS News Hour, July 27, 2017.

Many Americans are not getting screened for cancer, putting them at risk of missing out on earlier intervention or receiving a late-stage diagnosis, according to a recent federal report.

Melnyk, Bernadette. "Buckeye Summit promotes healthy communities." The Ohio State University Alumni News, Summer 2018.

In April, members of the Ohio State community and thought leaders on health and wellness came together for Buckeye Summit, a biennial gathering that seeks to make a positive impact on a pressing issue. This year’s challenge: How can we create healthy communities?

McKay, Betsy. "Vaping Doesn’t Often Help Smokers Quit, New Study Finds." The Wall Street Journal, July 9, 2018.

Adult smokers who didn’t use electronic vaping devices were more than twice as likely to quit, according to the study.

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