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Articles of Interest

Adolescent cigarette smoking has been falling for many years, but the decline in e-cigarette and hookah use was more remarkable.
No longer the hot new thing? Teen vaping falls, study says
STAT

2018

Carroll, Aaron E.. "https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/19/upshot/why-standing-desks-are-overrated.html." New York Times, November 19, 2018.

We know that physical activity is good for us, and that being sedentary is not. Some have extrapolated this to mean that sitting, in general, is something to be avoided, even at work. Perhaps as a result, standing desks have become trendy and are promoted by some health officials as well as some countries.

Research, however, suggests that warnings about sitting at work are overblown, and that standing desks are overrated as a way to improve health.

Gov. John Hickenlooper took new steps Friday to curb the use of e-cigarettes by teenagers in Colorado, signing an executive order that, among other things, directs state regulators to increase checks of retailers to make sure they are not selling the devices to underage shoppers.

Kishmore, Sandeep, et al. "Making The Case For The Chief Wellness Officer In America’s Health Systems: A Call To Action." Health Affairs, October 26, 2018.

Patient care is being compromised by increasing rates of burnout among America’s clinicians, involving not only physicians, but also nurses, advanced practice providers, and other healthcare workers. Burnout can lead, in some cases, to tragic and even fatal consequences for both clinicians and patients. Because burnout affects the majority of clinicians and suicidal ideation is more common in health professional trainees and practicing physicians than the general public, there is an urgent need for structured and systematic improvements to improve the work life and well-being of our nation’s clinicians.

Reedy, Jill, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D.. "Studying “Total Diet” and Its Impact on Health, Including Cancer Risk." National Cancer Institute, October 25, 2018.

Does what we eat and drink affect our risk of developing cancer?

We've all heard exercise helps you live longer. But a new study goes one step further, finding that a sedentary lifestyle is worse for your health than smoking, diabetes and heart disease.

"Texas A&M Leads an International Research Team in Testing a Software-based Intervention to get Workers Moving." Association of Schools & Programs of Public Health, October 16, 2018.

Fast forward 12 years and a research team led by Benden and Parag Sharma DrPH, a recent doctoral graduate of the School of Public Health, tested a new computer-based intervention aimed at increasing the number of position changes in a group of adults. Funded by OERC.org and other industry partners, the study was published in the journal Human Factors and used software that reminded users to change the position of their sit-stand desks and monitored their computer use time and desk position.

Agency seeks more information from companies as it continues to pursue its Youth Tobacco Prevention Plan amid evidence of sharply rising e-cigarette use among kids

Azar, Alex M. and Scott Gottlieb. "We cannot let e-cigarettes become an on-ramp for teenage addiction." Washington Post, October 11, 2018.

At the Department of Health and Human Services, we are deeply concerned about the risks that e-cigarettes pose for children, given how quickly teenage use of these products has accelerated. Using a small battery to heat a liquid that contains nicotine, e-cigarettes turn the liquid into an inhalable vapor. Since 2014, they have been the most popular nicotine product among American teenagers.

Ghosh, Tista. "Vaping is tobacco’s new guise to target Colorado kids." The Denver Post, August 3, 2018.

Think tobacco use has disappeared as a threat to our children’s health? It hasn’t. About one in three Colorado high school students are using nicotine. Most of them don’t smoke cigarettes or use chew tobacco, they’re doing something new. It’s called vaping.

Anna Edney and Olivia Zaleski. "Juul in FDA's Sights as U.S. Rethinks Position on E-Cigarettes." Bloomberg, October 2, 2018.

U.S. public health officials are changing their stance on the upstart e-cigarette industry.

Berman, Jae. "Want to live a longer life? Research says you should do these five things.." The Washington Post, August 21, 2018.

There seems to always be a mad dash toward the next new thing when it comes to nutrition and fitness — whether it’s the latest exercise craze, superfood or diet regimen. But leaping from fad to fad isn’t exactly a well-reasoned strategy for improving our health. Nor is it a way to create changes that stick — which are the only ones that will have an impact.

If we’re going to generate enough motivation to create sustainable change, we need to have clear objectives and understand how and why our habits fulfill those objectives. That way, when relapses or difficult moments arise — and they always do — our deeper motivation and plan keep us anchored.

If your objective is to live a longer, healthier life, a new study conducted by Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health lays out five practices, none of which needs to involve a fad.

The Food and Drug Administration is ramping up its teen tobacco-awareness campaign to include the dangers of vaping.

The agency has used its Real Cost campaign to dissuade teens from smoking cigarettes and chewing tobacco, but the latest iteration is focused on the dangers of vaping. It is educating teens that many of the same dangers of cigarettes, like nicotine addiction, lung damage, and cancer, are present in e-cigarettes or other vapes. 

FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD, declared teen use of electronic cigarettes an "epidemic" and said the agency would be addressing the issue with "the largest coordinated tobacco compliance effort in FDA's history."

Actions being considered -- but not yet undertaken -- include the immediate removal of certain flavored e-cigarettes from the market and shortening the time to market review for most cigarettes now being sold.

Joseph, Andrew. "Seven U.S. states now have adult obesity rates of 35 percent or higher." STAT, September 12, 2018.

In its report, the CDC called for a comprehensive strategy to reduce obesity prevalence, with steps including healthy eating, better sleep, stress management, and physical activity.

"How Firms Can Convince Employees to Quit Smoking." The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, August 28, 2018.

Wellness programs are increasing in popularity as companies grow more determined to curb the soaring costs of providing health insurance for employees. To encourage healthy behaviors, firms are offering everything from free yoga classes to weight-loss support groups. While there have been some positive results from these programs, smoking cessation remains a particular challenge. But a recent study by two University of Pennsylvania experts found that cash can be a powerful incentive to help smokers quit. 

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