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Articles of Interest

Sleek high-rises and first-rate financial institutions have long been the signature of Lujiazui, but what we really want to build is a healthy and green Lujiazui.
CEOs Pledge to Stub Out Smoking
China Daily

2021

Scherer, Liz. "The COVID-19 Vaccines and Cancer: What You Need to Know." Everyday Health, February 18, 2021.

Is it safe? Will you have a reaction? Will you develop antibodies if you’re immunosuppressed? We have the answers.

Migala, Jessica. "5 Early Signs of Lung Cancer." Everyday Health, February 18, 2021.

Dustin Diamond's death put a spotlight on an uncomfortable truth: Lung cancer is on the rise in never-smokers. Do you know how to spot the symptoms?

Rauf, Don. "The Latest Intel on Face Masks and the Coronavirus." Everyday Health, February 18, 2021.

Are you clear about what you should and shouldn’t be doing when it comes to wearing face masks during the pandemic? Here’s a look at the latest science on double masking, best and worst mask types, and more.

Swift, Diana. "More Support for Diet to Prevent Colorectal Cancer." MedPage Today, February 16, 2021.

— Umbrella review offers "convincing evidence" for ties between lower CRC risk and certain foods

Sood, Amit, MD. "Your 10-Point Self-Care Plan for Boosting Resilience This COVID-19 Winter." Everyday Health, January 26, 2021.

Even Amit Sood, MD, one of the leading experts in combatting chronic stress and building resilience, realized he had to up his well-being routine in the face of winter’s seasonal darkness and a still rampaging COVID-19 pandemic.

Consider which ones you might be able to incorporate into your everyday routine to build resilience and enhance your health and well-being. Let these self-care practices inspire you to learn about other evidence-based strategies you might be able to add to your resilience toolkit.

2020

Miller, Elizabeth. "How to Not Let Pandemic Fatigue Turn Into Pandemic Burnout." Everyday Health, November 9, 2020.

As the COVID-19 health crisis drags on (and on and on), lack of an endpoint is causing frayed nerves and heightened frustration. Here are strategies that can help.

"Costs of Cancer Executive Summary." American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, 2020.

Cancer is a leading cause of death and disease in the U.S. The American Cancer Society estimates that roughly 1.8 million new cases of cancer will be diagnosed in the U.S. in 2020 and more than 16.9 million Americans living today have a cancer history.1 Not only does cancer take an enormous toll on the health of patients and survivors – it also has a tremendous financial impact.

"Large Study Confirms that HPV Vaccine Prevents Cervical Cancer." National Cancer Institute, October 15, 2020.

In what many global health leaders are calling a milestone study, researchers in Sweden have confirmed that widespread use of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine dramatically reduces the number of women who will develop cervical cancer.

Migala,Jessica. "A Cancer Expert Shares What He Eats in a Day." Everyday Health, October 6, 2020.

A prestigious Harvard-trained doctor and scientist who specializes in cancer prevention reveals his go-to snack, what he orders when dining out, and what he’ll never eat again.

Boyles, Salynn. "Even "Light" Smoking Ups Lung Cancer Risk." MedPage Today, September 9, 2020.

Social smokers were more than eight times as likely to die of lung cancer than lifetime non-smokers, and their lung cancer risk was not substantially lower than that of heavier smokers in an analysis involving close to 19,000 people.

Beusekom, Mary Van. "Depression triples in US adults amid COVID-19 stressors." CIDRAP, September 3, 2020.

COVID-19 has tripled the rate of depression in US adults in all demographic groups—especially in those with financial worries—and the rise is much higher than after previous major traumatic events, according to a study published yesterday in JAMA Network Open.

Moon, Darrell. "How CEOs Can Align Incentives So Healthcare Works for Them." Forbes, August 25, 2020.

As a hospital administrator, I sat at the top of the healthcare food chain. My job was to keep my hospital full, and my primary customers were physicians.

I was teaching the staff how to apply Dr. W. Edwards Deming’s principals of continuous quality improvement to gain accreditation. One of the first questions he asks is, “Who is the customer?” Well, who was the customer who paid for our services? It wasn’t the doctors, and it wasn’t the insurance companies; they were just the intermediary. My primary customers were business leaders willing to purchase healthcare benefits for their employees

"New Campaign Encourages All to “Keep Up The Rates” and Get Vaccinated Amidst COVID-19." National Foundation for Infectious Diesease, August 18, 2020.

Today, a group of more than 85 leading public health organizations announced the launch of a new national campaign called “Keep Up The Rates” to raise awareness about the importance of getting routine vaccinations during the COVID-19 pandemic. The campaign, led by the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID), encourages all individuals to receive recommended vaccines that may have been delayed in recent months due to the  COVID-19 pandemic.

Today, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services released Healthy People 2030, the nation's 10-year plan for addressing our most critical public health priorities and challenges. Since 1980, HHS's Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion has set measurable objectives and targets to improve the health and well-being of the nation.

This decade, Healthy People 2030 features 355 core – or measurable – objectives with 10-year targets, new objectives related to opioid use disorder and youth e-cigarette use, and resources for adapting Healthy People 2030 to emerging public health threats like COVID-19. For the first time, Healthy People 2030 also sets 10-year targets for objectives related to social determinants of health.

By almost every measure, far fewer cancers are being diagnosed during the coronavirus pandemic, whether the decline shows up in screening mammograms and colonoscopies or in other tests ordered after troubling symptoms prompt a doctor’s visit.

research letter published Tuesday in JAMA Network Open notes a steep downward slope in newly identified cases of six common cancer types, based on weekly numbers from Quest Diagnostics. The clinical laboratory’s data add to similar analyses conducted in May and July from the electronic medical records vendor Epic and a July report from the COVID and Cancer Research Network on trends in cancer-related patient encounters.

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