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The Ohio State University Alumni News

2020

Boyles, Salynn. "Even "Light" Smoking Ups Lung Cancer Risk." MedPage Today, September 9, 2020.

Social smokers were more than eight times as likely to die of lung cancer than lifetime non-smokers, and their lung cancer risk was not substantially lower than that of heavier smokers in an analysis involving close to 19,000 people.

Beusekom, Mary Van. "Depression triples in US adults amid COVID-19 stressors." CIDRAP, September 3, 2020.

COVID-19 has tripled the rate of depression in US adults in all demographic groups—especially in those with financial worries—and the rise is much higher than after previous major traumatic events, according to a study published yesterday in JAMA Network Open.

Moon, Darrell. "How CEOs Can Align Incentives So Healthcare Works for Them." Forbes, August 25, 2020.

As a hospital administrator, I sat at the top of the healthcare food chain. My job was to keep my hospital full, and my primary customers were physicians.

I was teaching the staff how to apply Dr. W. Edwards Deming’s principals of continuous quality improvement to gain accreditation. One of the first questions he asks is, “Who is the customer?” Well, who was the customer who paid for our services? It wasn’t the doctors, and it wasn’t the insurance companies; they were just the intermediary. My primary customers were business leaders willing to purchase healthcare benefits for their employees

"New Campaign Encourages All to “Keep Up The Rates” and Get Vaccinated Amidst COVID-19." National Foundation for Infectious Diesease, August 18, 2020.

Today, a group of more than 85 leading public health organizations announced the launch of a new national campaign called “Keep Up The Rates” to raise awareness about the importance of getting routine vaccinations during the COVID-19 pandemic. The campaign, led by the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID), encourages all individuals to receive recommended vaccines that may have been delayed in recent months due to the  COVID-19 pandemic.

Today, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services released Healthy People 2030, the nation's 10-year plan for addressing our most critical public health priorities and challenges. Since 1980, HHS's Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion has set measurable objectives and targets to improve the health and well-being of the nation.

This decade, Healthy People 2030 features 355 core – or measurable – objectives with 10-year targets, new objectives related to opioid use disorder and youth e-cigarette use, and resources for adapting Healthy People 2030 to emerging public health threats like COVID-19. For the first time, Healthy People 2030 also sets 10-year targets for objectives related to social determinants of health.

By almost every measure, far fewer cancers are being diagnosed during the coronavirus pandemic, whether the decline shows up in screening mammograms and colonoscopies or in other tests ordered after troubling symptoms prompt a doctor’s visit.

research letter published Tuesday in JAMA Network Open notes a steep downward slope in newly identified cases of six common cancer types, based on weekly numbers from Quest Diagnostics. The clinical laboratory’s data add to similar analyses conducted in May and July from the electronic medical records vendor Epic and a July report from the COVID and Cancer Research Network on trends in cancer-related patient encounters.

Firth, Shannon. "Former HHS Officials Explore Vaccine Hesitancy in Black Community." MedPage Today, August 3, 2020.

Past and present U.S. Surgeons General, speaking at the National Medical Association's virtual annual convention, said vaccine hesitancy in the Black community could worsen the disparate impact of COVID-19.

Current Surgeon General Jerome Adams, MD, MPH, who moderated the online discussion Saturday, said he believes that a COVID-19 vaccine will be ready by the end of this year or early next.

"But a safe and effective vaccine means nothing if people don't actually get vaccinated," Adams said.

Frieden, Joyce. "Efforts Needed to Get Minorities Into Clinical Trials, Experts Say." MedPage Today, August 3, 2020.

More work needs to be done to enroll people of color in clinical trials, Freda Lewis-Hall, MD, chief patient officer and executive vice president at Pfizer, said Sunday at the annual meeting of the National Medical Association.

"One of the really interesting things the data tell us about participation in clinical trials of Black and brown people is they are much less likely to be asked," Lewis-Hall said during the plenary session of the meeting, which was held remotely.

D'Ambrosio, Amanda. "ACS Calls for HPV Testing Alone for Cervical Cancer Screening." MedPage Today, July 31, 2020.

Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing every 5 years should be used to screen patients ages 25 to 65 for cervical cancer, according to updated guidelines released by the American Cancer Society (ACS).

The simplified guidelines state that women with a cervix should start molecular HPV testing at age 25 -- 4 years later than previous guidelines suggest. If primary HPV testing is not available, either a Pap test every 3 years or cotesting (i.e., combined cytology and HPV tests) every 5 years is acceptable, according to the new recommendations published in the ACS journal CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek. "Working Well While Working From Home." The Ohio State University Alumni Association, July 16, 2020.

Is your commute a shuffle down the hall in slippers and a robe? Many of us could be mixing work and home for the long haul, making this a good time to evaluate your at-home work life so you can stay well, calm and focused.

Working from home has gone from an emergency strategy meant to last a few weeks to a revolution in the way we do business. Now many people report that they would like to continue working from home even after the COVID-19 crisis settles down. If you plan to work from home for the long haul, it’s time to develop new long-term strategies to stay well and cope with stress.

Reilly, Colleen. "The Rise Of The Chief Wellbeing Officer." Forbes, July 7, 2020.

In these unprecedented times, comprehensive wellbeing (mental, emotional, physical, financial and professional) in the workplace is so important. How we support ourselves, and how we support others within our businesses - such as business partners, clients and contacts - is crucial. The good news is that companies are progressively making the care of their people a top priority.

Lou, Nicole. "In Fight Against COVID-19, Physical Activity Falls Off a Cliff." MedPage Today, June 30, 2020.

Fitness tracker data from around the world illustrated how each country's response to COVID-19 affected physical activity among residents.

In the first 10 days after the World Health Organization's March 11 declaration that COVID-19 was officially a global pandemic, smartphone users worldwide showed a 5.5% decrease in mean daily steps (287 fewer steps).

For the past decade, evidence has suggested that Gardasil, the HPV vaccine, could stem an epidemic of throat cancer. But it has also never received approval from the Food and Drug Administration for that use — and it was unclear if it ever would.

On Friday, the agency granted that approval, clearing the latest version of the vaccine, Gardasil 9, to prevent a cancer that affects 13,500 Americans annually. The decision was announced by Gardasil’s maker, Merck.

Bankhead, Charles. "PCPs Seek Identity in Cancer Survivor Care." Medpage Today, June 10, 2020.

A professional identity crisis has begun to emerge among primary care clinicians regarding their role in caring for cancer survivors, authors of a survey of physicians, nurses, and physician assistants (PAs) concluded.

Survey participants had widely divergent views regarding primary care's role in cancer survivor care and about the concept of survivorship. A few providers said responsibility for follow-up after acute care belonged entirely to oncology. Alternatively, some respondents viewed cancer survivors as no different from other patients with chronic conditions.

Walker, Molly. "Quarantine Brings up More Issues for Patients with Obesity." MedPage Today, June 10, 2020.

Patients with obesity not only reported more anxiety and depression, but the majority reported less exercise, more stress eating, and increased stockpiling of food due to COVID-19 stay-at-home orders, researchers found.

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