You are here

Articles of Interest: COVID-19

“Coronavirus Pandemic Adds to Anxiety and Stress for Cancer Patients, Survivors”
Helping Cancer Survivors Cope with Cancer-Related Anxiety and Distress
National Cancer Institute

2020

Lou, Nicole. "In Fight Against COVID-19, Physical Activity Falls Off a Cliff." MedPage Today, June 30, 2020.

Fitness tracker data from around the world illustrated how each country's response to COVID-19 affected physical activity among residents.

In the first 10 days after the World Health Organization's March 11 declaration that COVID-19 was officially a global pandemic, smartphone users worldwide showed a 5.5% decrease in mean daily steps (287 fewer steps).

Walker, Molly. "Quarantine Brings up More Issues for Patients with Obesity." MedPage Today, June 10, 2020.

Patients with obesity not only reported more anxiety and depression, but the majority reported less exercise, more stress eating, and increased stockpiling of food due to COVID-19 stay-at-home orders, researchers found.

Firth, Shannon. "Vaccine Access, Hesitancy Amid COVID-19." MedPage Today, June 3, 2020.

Overcoming vaccine hesitancy and access issues has become even more critical because of the COVID-19 pandemic, public health experts argued at a recent webinar hosted by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

As it became clear in March that the coronavirus was tearing through the U.S., federal health officials and cancer societies urged Americans to delay their routine mammograms and colonoscopies. The public has heeded those recommendations — and that’s helped lead to an apocalyptic drop in cancer screenings, according to a white paper released Monday by the electronic medical records vendor Epic.

NCI Staff. "Helping Cancer Survivors Cope with Cancer-Related Anxiety and Distress." National Cancer Institute, April 30, 2020.

Being diagnosed with cancer and going through intensive treatment is stressful. So, when treatment ends, family and friends are eager to celebrate. But many cancer survivors don’t feel like celebrating or don’t feel ready to move on with their lives.

Pavlik, MA CTTS, Jim; Chad Morris, PhD. "COVID-19: Tobacco Use and Health Disparities Populations." Behavorial Health & Wellness Program, April 13, 2020.

Smoking and vaping may lead to worse clinical outcomes following respiratory infections, which is particularly relevant during the COVID-19 pandemic. Many groups of Americans, such as persons living in poverty, individuals with behavioral health conditions, and persons involved with the criminal justice system, smoke and use other nicotine products at high rates and are at greater risk after contracting COVID-19 and other infectious diseases. 

Gretler, Corinne. "Smoking Helps Open Gateway to Coronavirus Infection, Study Shows." Bloomberg, April 8, 2020.

Smoking may raise the risk of Covid-19 by elevating enzymes that allow the coronavirus to gain access into lung cells, according to a new study.

Smokers and people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may have elevated levels of an enzyme called ACE-2, which helps the virus enter cells in their lungs, where it replicates, a study published in the European Respiratory Journal Thursday showed.

Boyles, Salynn. "Smokers Face Greater Risk from COVID-19." MedPage Today, April 8, 2020.

It is a familiar public health message that has taken on new urgency in the time of the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic: If you smoke, you need to quit.

The sooner, the better.

Tobacco users face an elevated risk for a long list of chronic diseases and malignancies, and there is growing evidence that smoking, and possibly vaping, also increase the risk for life-threatening complications and death from COVID-19.

The news about the COVID-19 global pandemic has everyone concerned. Those who smoke or vape e-cigarettes, or care about someone who does, may be especially worried because the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 attacks the lungs and could be a particularly serious threat to tobacco users.