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Articles of Interest: COVID-19

The pandemic has interrupted and delayed routine vaccinations for many people, including children.
Vaccine Access, Hesitancy Amid COVID-19
MedPage Today

2021

Reports of swollen underarm lymph nodes after vaccination prompts experts to issue new mammography screening recommendations

Scherer, Liz. "The COVID-19 Vaccines and Cancer: What You Need to Know." Everyday Health, February 18, 2021.

Is it safe? Will you have a reaction? Will you develop antibodies if you’re immunosuppressed? We have the answers.

Rauf, Don. "The Latest Intel on Face Masks and the Coronavirus." Everyday Health, February 18, 2021.

Are you clear about what you should and shouldn’t be doing when it comes to wearing face masks during the pandemic? Here’s a look at the latest science on double masking, best and worst mask types, and more.

Sood, Amit, MD. "Your 10-Point Self-Care Plan for Boosting Resilience This COVID-19 Winter." Everyday Health, January 26, 2021.

Even Amit Sood, MD, one of the leading experts in combatting chronic stress and building resilience, realized he had to up his well-being routine in the face of winter’s seasonal darkness and a still rampaging COVID-19 pandemic.

Consider which ones you might be able to incorporate into your everyday routine to build resilience and enhance your health and well-being. Let these self-care practices inspire you to learn about other evidence-based strategies you might be able to add to your resilience toolkit.

2020

Miller, Elizabeth. "How to Not Let Pandemic Fatigue Turn Into Pandemic Burnout." Everyday Health, November 9, 2020.

As the COVID-19 health crisis drags on (and on and on), lack of an endpoint is causing frayed nerves and heightened frustration. Here are strategies that can help.

Beusekom, Mary Van. "Depression triples in US adults amid COVID-19 stressors." CIDRAP, September 3, 2020.

COVID-19 has tripled the rate of depression in US adults in all demographic groups—especially in those with financial worries—and the rise is much higher than after previous major traumatic events, according to a study published yesterday in JAMA Network Open.

"New Campaign Encourages All to “Keep Up The Rates” and Get Vaccinated Amidst COVID-19." National Foundation for Infectious Diesease, August 18, 2020.

Today, a group of more than 85 leading public health organizations announced the launch of a new national campaign called “Keep Up The Rates” to raise awareness about the importance of getting routine vaccinations during the COVID-19 pandemic. The campaign, led by the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID), encourages all individuals to receive recommended vaccines that may have been delayed in recent months due to the  COVID-19 pandemic.

By almost every measure, far fewer cancers are being diagnosed during the coronavirus pandemic, whether the decline shows up in screening mammograms and colonoscopies or in other tests ordered after troubling symptoms prompt a doctor’s visit.

research letter published Tuesday in JAMA Network Open notes a steep downward slope in newly identified cases of six common cancer types, based on weekly numbers from Quest Diagnostics. The clinical laboratory’s data add to similar analyses conducted in May and July from the electronic medical records vendor Epic and a July report from the COVID and Cancer Research Network on trends in cancer-related patient encounters.

Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek. "Working Well While Working From Home." The Ohio State University Alumni Association, July 16, 2020.

Is your commute a shuffle down the hall in slippers and a robe? Many of us could be mixing work and home for the long haul, making this a good time to evaluate your at-home work life so you can stay well, calm and focused.

Working from home has gone from an emergency strategy meant to last a few weeks to a revolution in the way we do business. Now many people report that they would like to continue working from home even after the COVID-19 crisis settles down. If you plan to work from home for the long haul, it’s time to develop new long-term strategies to stay well and cope with stress.

Lou, Nicole. "In Fight Against COVID-19, Physical Activity Falls Off a Cliff." MedPage Today, June 30, 2020.

Fitness tracker data from around the world illustrated how each country's response to COVID-19 affected physical activity among residents.

In the first 10 days after the World Health Organization's March 11 declaration that COVID-19 was officially a global pandemic, smartphone users worldwide showed a 5.5% decrease in mean daily steps (287 fewer steps).

Walker, Molly. "Quarantine Brings up More Issues for Patients with Obesity." MedPage Today, June 10, 2020.

Patients with obesity not only reported more anxiety and depression, but the majority reported less exercise, more stress eating, and increased stockpiling of food due to COVID-19 stay-at-home orders, researchers found.

Firth, Shannon. "Vaccine Access, Hesitancy Amid COVID-19." MedPage Today, June 3, 2020.

Overcoming vaccine hesitancy and access issues has become even more critical because of the COVID-19 pandemic, public health experts argued at a recent webinar hosted by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

As it became clear in March that the coronavirus was tearing through the U.S., federal health officials and cancer societies urged Americans to delay their routine mammograms and colonoscopies. The public has heeded those recommendations — and that’s helped lead to an apocalyptic drop in cancer screenings, according to a white paper released Monday by the electronic medical records vendor Epic.

NCI Staff. "Helping Cancer Survivors Cope with Cancer-Related Anxiety and Distress." National Cancer Institute, April 30, 2020.

Being diagnosed with cancer and going through intensive treatment is stressful. So, when treatment ends, family and friends are eager to celebrate. But many cancer survivors don’t feel like celebrating or don’t feel ready to move on with their lives.

Pavlik, MA CTTS, Jim; Chad Morris, PhD. "COVID-19: Tobacco Use and Health Disparities Populations." Behavorial Health & Wellness Program, April 13, 2020.

Smoking and vaping may lead to worse clinical outcomes following respiratory infections, which is particularly relevant during the COVID-19 pandemic. Many groups of Americans, such as persons living in poverty, individuals with behavioral health conditions, and persons involved with the criminal justice system, smoke and use other nicotine products at high rates and are at greater risk after contracting COVID-19 and other infectious diseases. 

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