You are here

Articles of Interest: Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems

‘Safer’ does not mean ‘safe.’
E-cigs pack a harmful punch
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

2018

Ghosh, Tista. "Vaping is tobacco’s new guise to target Colorado kids." The Denver Post, August 3, 2018.

Think tobacco use has disappeared as a threat to our children’s health? It hasn’t. About one in three Colorado high school students are using nicotine. Most of them don’t smoke cigarettes or use chew tobacco, they’re doing something new. It’s called vaping.

Anna Edney and Olivia Zaleski. "Juul in FDA's Sights as U.S. Rethinks Position on E-Cigarettes." Bloomberg, October 2, 2018.

U.S. public health officials are changing their stance on the upstart e-cigarette industry.

The Food and Drug Administration is ramping up its teen tobacco-awareness campaign to include the dangers of vaping.

The agency has used its Real Cost campaign to dissuade teens from smoking cigarettes and chewing tobacco, but the latest iteration is focused on the dangers of vaping. It is educating teens that many of the same dangers of cigarettes, like nicotine addiction, lung damage, and cancer, are present in e-cigarettes or other vapes. 

FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD, declared teen use of electronic cigarettes an "epidemic" and said the agency would be addressing the issue with "the largest coordinated tobacco compliance effort in FDA's history."

Actions being considered -- but not yet undertaken -- include the immediate removal of certain flavored e-cigarettes from the market and shortening the time to market review for most cigarettes now being sold.

Jayne O'Donnell, Ken Alltucker and Josephine Chu. "Teens hooked by vaping: FDA weighing a ban on flavored e-cigarette liquids." USA Today, August 13, 2018.

Teen vaping is reaching epidemic levels and FDA is considering regulation to curb it. One proposal would be banning flavoring of e-cigarette liquids. USA TODAY

"E-cigarettes may help adults quit but get teens hooked." Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, August 10, 2018.

Makers of e-cigarettes say their products could save lives by helping adult smokers quit traditional cigarettes. But critics say that the electronic devices, which deliver nicotine via a heated aerosol and come in fruit flavors, are being marketed to teens and could put young people on the path to nicotine addiction.

Selig, Roni; Maddie Bender and Davide Cannaviccio. "Juul and the vape debate: Choosing between smokers and teens." CNN Health, August 9, 2018.

The teen vaping epidemic has made its mark in high schools.

"4 marketing tactics e-cigarette companies use to target youth." The Truth Initiative, August 9, 2018.

From introducing appealing flavors to offering college scholarships, manufacturers and sellers of e-cigarettes aggressively target young people.

McKay, Betsy. "Vaping Doesn’t Often Help Smokers Quit, New Study Finds." The Wall Street Journal, July 9, 2018.

Adult smokers who didn’t use electronic vaping devices were more than twice as likely to quit, according to the study.

Pearson, Anthony, MD. "E-Cigs: How Much Help vs How Much Harm? ." MedPage Today, May, 27, 2018.

Hooking kids on nicotine a steep price to pay for helping some smokers quit, says Skeptical Cardiologist.

Data on e-cigarettes show that they are the most popular tobacco products among youth, with more than 11 percent reporting in 2016 that they currently use the devices. If that sounds concerning, consider this: there is good reason to believe that the numbers are underestimating the problem.

"E-cigs pack a harmful punch." Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, April 4, 2018.

Although e-cigarettes may be a useful tool for people trying to quit regular cigarettes, they also contain harmful chemicals, including formaldehyde and diacetyl, according to Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health’s Joseph Allen.

Zernike, Kate. ""I Can't Stop": Schools Struggle with Vaping Explosion." The New York Times, April 2, 2018.

The student had been caught vaping in school three times before he sat in the vice principal’s office at Cape Elizabeth High School in Maine this winter and shamefacedly admitted what by then was obvious.

“I can’t stop,” he told the vice principal, Nate Carpenter.

Multiple medical organizations have filed suit against the FDA, alleging that delays in the regulation of electronic cigarettes and cigars will unnecessarily expose children and teens to flavored, and other kid-friendly tobacco products, for years to come.

2017

"Decline in teen smoking offset by rising popularity of vaping." Truth Initiative, December 14, 2017.

New data from the 2017 Monitoring the Future study show a decline in teen smoking rates — including a first-ever drop below 10 percent for 12th graders — but may hide the true rates of vaping due to misperceptions.

Pages