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Articles of Interest: Nutrition & Healthy Weight

The CDC is calling for a comprehensive strategy to reduce obesity prevalence, with steps including healthy eating.
Seven U.S. states now have adult obesity rates of 35 percent or higher
STAT

2019

McGinley, Laurie. "The Disturbing Links Between Too Much Weight and Several Types of Cancer." The Washington Post, April 14, 2019.
"Higher consumption of sugary beverages linked with increased risk of mortality." Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, March 18, 2019.

The more sugar-sweetened beverages(SSBs) people consumed, the greater their risk of premature death—particularly death from cardiovascular disease, and to a lesser extent from cancer, according to a large long-term study of U.S. men and women. The risk of early death linked with drinking SSBs was more pronounced among women.

2018

Reedy, Jill, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D.. "Studying “Total Diet” and Its Impact on Health, Including Cancer Risk." National Cancer Institute, October 25, 2018.

Does what we eat and drink affect our risk of developing cancer?

Joseph, Andrew. "Seven U.S. states now have adult obesity rates of 35 percent or higher." STAT, September 12, 2018.

In its report, the CDC called for a comprehensive strategy to reduce obesity prevalence, with steps including healthy eating, better sleep, stress management, and physical activity.

A high body-mass index (BMI) as well as gaining large amounts of weight irrespective of starting BMI both contribute to obesity-related cancers, although not necessarily the same ones, a large epidemiological study from Norway suggested.

Shockney, Lillie D., RN, BS, MAS, ONN-CG. "Obesity Is Tied to Increased Risk for Cancer Among the Young." Academy of Oncology Nurse and Patient Navigators, April 9, 2018.

Evidence from more than 100 research publications has shown that obesity increases the risk for 13 different cancers in young adults. This meta-analysis describes how obesity has shifted specific types of cancers to younger age groups, and intensified cellular mechanisms that promote the disease.

2017

Healthier beverage choices are becoming more popular among the U.S. population, a new study found.

Brody, Jane E. "The Growing Toll of Our Ever-Expanding Waistlines." New York Times, November 13, 2017.

Many cancer deaths were averted after millions quit lighting up, but they are now rising because even greater numbers are unable to keep their waistlines in check.

2009

Heinen, Luann and Helen Darling . "Addressing Obesity in the Workplace: The Role of Employers." National Business Group on Health, 2009.

This article describes the employer’s perspective on the cost impact of obesity, discusses current practices in employer-sponsored wellness and weight management programs, provides examples from U.S. companies illustrating key points of employers’ leverage and opportunities, and suggests policy directions to support the expansion of employers’ initiatives, especially for smaller employers.

2008

"Obesity Costs U.S. Companies as Much as $45 Billion a Year." The Conference Board Press Release, April 9, 2008.

The rate of obesity in the United States has doubled in the last 30 years, and those extra pounds weigh on companies’ bottom lines, according to a new report from The Conference Board. Today, 34 percent of American adults fit the definition of “obese.” Obese employees cost U.S. private employers an estimated $45 billion annually in medical expenditures and work loss. 

2007

"To Avoid the Big C, Stay Small." The Economist, November 1, 2007.

EVERY day there are new stories in the tabloids about the latest link, sometimes tenuous, sometimes contradictory, between cancer and some aspect of lifestyle. If this is a recipe for confusion, then the antidote is probably a weighty new tome from the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF). It is the most rigorous study so far on the links between food, physical activity and cancer—and sets out the important sources of risk.