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Articles of Interest: Nutrition & Healthy Weight

Obesity can permanently alter a young person’s likelihood of developing cancer.
Obesity Is Tied to Increased Risk for Cancer Among the Young
Academy of Oncology Nurse and Patient Navigators

2021

Minerd, Jeff. "Deaths From Obesity-Related Cancers on the Rise." MedPage Today, May 10, 2021.

— Trends parallel those already observed for heart disease

Minered, Jeff. "Stay-at-Home Orders Linked to Weight Gain." MedPage Today, March 22, 2021.

Americans gained weight after being told to stay out of public places during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a small longitudinal cohort study.

Swift, Diana. "More Support for Diet to Prevent Colorectal Cancer." MedPage Today, February 16, 2021.

— Umbrella review offers "convincing evidence" for ties between lower CRC risk and certain foods

NCI Staff. "Obesity May Help Tumors Survive and Grow, Mouse Study Suggests." Cancer Currents Blog, January 22, 2021.

Obesity alters many processes in the body, from how sugar is used to how the heart functions. It can also change the relationship between cancer cells and nearby immune cells in ways that help tumors survive and grow, according to a new study conducted largely in mice. 

2020

Migala,Jessica. "A Cancer Expert Shares What He Eats in a Day." Everyday Health, October 6, 2020.

A prestigious Harvard-trained doctor and scientist who specializes in cancer prevention reveals his go-to snack, what he orders when dining out, and what he’ll never eat again.

Lawler, Moira. "A Comprehensive Guide to an Anti-Inflammatory Diet." Everyday Health, June 29, 2020.

Are you interested in learning which foods make up the anti-inflammatory diet and how it may help you ward off certain diseases? Read on.

Roan, Shari. "New Cancer Prevention Guidelines Highlight Exercise and Foods to Avoid." Everyday Health, June 11, 2020.

More exercise, no alcohol, and a colorful plate stand out among new cancer prevention guidelines.

Walker, Molly. "Quarantine Brings up More Issues for Patients with Obesity." MedPage Today, June 10, 2020.

Patients with obesity not only reported more anxiety and depression, but the majority reported less exercise, more stress eating, and increased stockpiling of food due to COVID-19 stay-at-home orders, researchers found.

The American Cancer Society has updated its guideline for diet and physical activity for cancer prevention, with adjustments to reflect the most current evidence. The updated recommendations increase recommended levels of physical activity and have an increased emphasis on reducing the consumption of processed and red meat, sugar-sweetened beverages, processed foods, and alcohol. They also include evidenced-based strategies to reduce barriers to healthy eating and active living and to reduce alcohol consumption. The guideline is published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, the ACS’s flagship medical journal.

Nackerdien, Zeena. "Losing Weight after age 50 may lower breast cancer risk." MedPage Today, January 15, 2020.

In the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Lauren R. Teras, PhD, of the American Cancer Society in Atlanta, and colleagues found that women age 50 years or older who lost weight and kept it off had a lower risk of breast cancer compared with those whose weight stayed the same.

Nackerdien, Zeena. "Obesity in America: Who is Most Affected?." MedPage Today, January 2, 2020.

Nearly half of U.S. adults will be obese by 2030 if current trends continue, with almost one-quarter projected to be severely obese, according to an analysis considered highly predictive that corrected for self-reporting bias.  Note that severe obesity is also likely to become the most common body mass index category among women, non-Hispanic black adults, and adults with low income.

2019

Kaufman, Pamela. "Can What You Eat Beat Disease? It May, and an Acclaimed Researcher Shares How." Everyday Health, October 26, 2019.

In an exclusive interview with Everyday Health, William W. Li, MD, author of the book 'Eat to Beat Disease,' discusses how nutrition can play a role in preventing and fighting disease.

Jeff Minerd. "Obesity-Associated Cancers on the Rise in Younger Patients." MedPage Today, 8/15/19.

Obesity-associated cancers are affecting people at earlier ages in the U.S., a population-based study found.

The analysis of more than 2.6 million incident cases from 2000 to 2016 found that the percentage of new cases of obesity-associated cancer occurring in individuals 65 and older decreased over this interval, whereas it increased in those ages 50-64, said Siran Koroukian, PhD, of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, and colleagues.

Bankhead, Charles. "More Evidence Links Body Fat with Prostate Cancer." MedPage Today, June 12, 2019.

Increasing body fat accumulation significantly raised men's odds of developing advanced and fatal prostate cancer, data from a large prospective study of men in Iceland showed.

Higher concentrations of visceral and thigh fat increased the odds of aggressive or fatal prostate cancer by 30%-40% as compared with leaner men. The prostate cancer risk associated with increased visceral fat accumulation carried over to men who had a lower BMI, reported Barbra A. Dickerman, PhD, of the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, and colleagues.

Collins, Frances. "Ultra-Processed Diet Leads to Extra Calories, Weight Gain." NIH Director's Blog, May 21, 2019.

If you’ve ever tried to lose a few pounds or just stay at a healthy weight, you’ve likely encountered a dizzying array of diets, each with passionate proponents: low carb, low fat, keto, paleo, vegan, Mediterranean, and so on. Yet most nutrition experts agree on one thing: it’s best to steer clear of ultra-processed foods. Now, there’s some solid scientific evidence to back up that advice.

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