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Articles of Interest: Nutrition & Healthy Weight

Increasing body fat accumulation significantly raised men's odds of developing advanced and fatal prostate cancer.
More Evidence Links Body Fat with Prostate Cancer
MedPage Today

2019

Jeff Minerd. "Obesity-Associated Cancers on the Rise in Younger Patients." MedPage Today, 8/15/19.

Obesity-associated cancers are affecting people at earlier ages in the U.S., a population-based study found.

The analysis of more than 2.6 million incident cases from 2000 to 2016 found that the percentage of new cases of obesity-associated cancer occurring in individuals 65 and older decreased over this interval, whereas it increased in those ages 50-64, said Siran Koroukian, PhD, of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, and colleagues.

Bankhead, Charles. "More Evidence Links Body Fat with Prostate Cancer." MedPage Today, June 12, 2019.

Increasing body fat accumulation significantly raised men's odds of developing advanced and fatal prostate cancer, data from a large prospective study of men in Iceland showed.

Higher concentrations of visceral and thigh fat increased the odds of aggressive or fatal prostate cancer by 30%-40% as compared with leaner men. The prostate cancer risk associated with increased visceral fat accumulation carried over to men who had a lower BMI, reported Barbra A. Dickerman, PhD, of the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, and colleagues.

Collins, Frances. "Ultra-Processed Diet Leads to Extra Calories, Weight Gain." NIH Director's Blog, May 21, 2019.

If you’ve ever tried to lose a few pounds or just stay at a healthy weight, you’ve likely encountered a dizzying array of diets, each with passionate proponents: low carb, low fat, keto, paleo, vegan, Mediterranean, and so on. Yet most nutrition experts agree on one thing: it’s best to steer clear of ultra-processed foods. Now, there’s some solid scientific evidence to back up that advice.

McGinley, Laurie. "The Disturbing Links Between Too Much Weight and Several Types of Cancer." The Washington Post, April 14, 2019.
"Higher consumption of sugary beverages linked with increased risk of mortality." Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, March 18, 2019.

The more sugar-sweetened beverages(SSBs) people consumed, the greater their risk of premature death—particularly death from cardiovascular disease, and to a lesser extent from cancer, according to a large long-term study of U.S. men and women. The risk of early death linked with drinking SSBs was more pronounced among women.

Incollingo, Beth Fand. "Sweet Surrender: Will Cutting Out Sugar Help You Prevent Cancer?." CURE, February 20, 2019.

The latest findings about the dangers of eating sugar and carrying extra body fat may spell bad news when it comes to dietary freedom, but being aware of them gives people the power to lower their cancer risk.

Recent studies confirmed that two diet-related culprits can contribute to the development of cancer: eating sugar, which increases the body’s production of insulin, and having excess body fat, which leads to inflammation. Perhaps surprisingly, these processes happen not only in those who are obese or overweight but also in people who are considered a normal size based on their body mass index (BMI).

 

2018

Reedy, Jill, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D.. "Studying “Total Diet” and Its Impact on Health, Including Cancer Risk." National Cancer Institute, October 25, 2018.

Does what we eat and drink affect our risk of developing cancer?

Joseph, Andrew. "Seven U.S. states now have adult obesity rates of 35 percent or higher." STAT, September 12, 2018.

In its report, the CDC called for a comprehensive strategy to reduce obesity prevalence, with steps including healthy eating, better sleep, stress management, and physical activity.

A high body-mass index (BMI) as well as gaining large amounts of weight irrespective of starting BMI both contribute to obesity-related cancers, although not necessarily the same ones, a large epidemiological study from Norway suggested.

Shockney, Lillie D., RN, BS, MAS, ONN-CG. "Obesity Is Tied to Increased Risk for Cancer Among the Young." Academy of Oncology Nurse and Patient Navigators, April 9, 2018.

Evidence from more than 100 research publications has shown that obesity increases the risk for 13 different cancers in young adults. This meta-analysis describes how obesity has shifted specific types of cancers to younger age groups, and intensified cellular mechanisms that promote the disease.

Scott Gottlieb, MD. "Reducing the Burden of Chronic Disease." US Food & Drug Administration, March 29, 2018.

More than 630,000 Americans die every year from heart disease.

It’s followed closely by cancer as the second leading cause of death in America, with another 600,000 Americans dying annually from cancer.

While we’ve made progress in reducing deaths due to cancer and heart disease -- in part due to reductions in smoking -- some of that progress is now being offset by the increasing problem of obesity.

2017

Healthier beverage choices are becoming more popular among the U.S. population, a new study found.

Brody, Jane E. "The Growing Toll of Our Ever-Expanding Waistlines." New York Times, November 13, 2017.

Many cancer deaths were averted after millions quit lighting up, but they are now rising because even greater numbers are unable to keep their waistlines in check.

2009

Heinen, Luann and Helen Darling . "Addressing Obesity in the Workplace: The Role of Employers." National Business Group on Health, 2009.

This article describes the employer’s perspective on the cost impact of obesity, discusses current practices in employer-sponsored wellness and weight management programs, provides examples from U.S. companies illustrating key points of employers’ leverage and opportunities, and suggests policy directions to support the expansion of employers’ initiatives, especially for smaller employers.

2008

"Obesity Costs U.S. Companies as Much as $45 Billion a Year." The Conference Board Press Release, April 9, 2008.

The rate of obesity in the United States has doubled in the last 30 years, and those extra pounds weigh on companies’ bottom lines, according to a new report from The Conference Board. Today, 34 percent of American adults fit the definition of “obese.” Obese employees cost U.S. private employers an estimated $45 billion annually in medical expenditures and work loss. 

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