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Articles of Interest: Overall Outcomes & ROI

Rather than a wellness program, create a culture of “total health”
Workplace Wellness Isn't Just for Big Corporations. Here's How Small Business Can Build a Culture of Health.
Entrepreneur

2020

Moon, Darrell. "How CEOs Can Align Incentives So Healthcare Works for Them." Forbes, August 25, 2020.

As a hospital administrator, I sat at the top of the healthcare food chain. My job was to keep my hospital full, and my primary customers were physicians.

I was teaching the staff how to apply Dr. W. Edwards Deming’s principals of continuous quality improvement to gain accreditation. One of the first questions he asks is, “Who is the customer?” Well, who was the customer who paid for our services? It wasn’t the doctors, and it wasn’t the insurance companies; they were just the intermediary. My primary customers were business leaders willing to purchase healthcare benefits for their employees

Moon, Darrell. "How CEOs Can Align Incentives So Healthcare Works for Them." Forbes, August 25, 2020.

As a hospital administrator, I sat at the top of the healthcare food chain. My job was to keep my hospital full, and my primary customers were physicians.

I was teaching the staff how to apply Dr. W. Edwards Deming’s principals of continuous quality improvement to gain accreditation. One of the first questions he asks is, “Who is the customer?” Well, who was the customer who paid for our services? It wasn’t the doctors, and it wasn’t the insurance companies; they were just the intermediary. My primary customers were business leaders willing to purchase healthcare benefits for their employees

Reilly, Colleen. "The Rise Of The Chief Wellbeing Officer." Forbes, July 7, 2020.

In these unprecedented times, comprehensive wellbeing (mental, emotional, physical, financial and professional) in the workplace is so important. How we support ourselves, and how we support others within our businesses - such as business partners, clients and contacts - is crucial. The good news is that companies are progressively making the care of their people a top priority.

Over the past decade, wellness has ballooned into a $4.2 trillion business. In the crowded marketplace of self-improvement, hardcore health innovations jostle with softcore supplements in the jade egg domain. Meanwhile, “hustle” culture has spawned a kind of work worship that has many people burning out and questioning how much they should really expect to get from (or give to) their jobs. In the midst of all this, workplace wellness is on the rise; more than 80 percent of large companies and 50 percent of small companies have implemented such programs. Despite their pervasiveness, big questions linger over what, exactly, works.  

2019

CHICAGO–In patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), both current and former smoking is associated with worse treatment outcomes in treatment-naïve patients. A history of smoking is associated with molecular and cytogenetic risk factors, suggesting that it is tied to biological characteristics of the tumor rather than smoking-related comorbidities.

Clinicians and public health practitioners should start considering the concept of flourishing when examining patients and assessing population-level health trends, according to a new Viewpoint article in JAMA, authored by Tyler VanderWeele, Ph.D. (Human Flourishing Program — Harvard), Eileen McNeely, Ph.D. (SHINE— Harvard), and Howard K. Koh, M.D., M.P.H. (Culture of Health — Harvard). It explores how even more holistic measures of “well-being” from medicine, psychology, economics, sociology, and government, while coming closer to capturing an individual’s complete wellbeing, still often fall short.

2018

Kishmore, Sandeep, et al. "Making The Case For The Chief Wellness Officer In America’s Health Systems: A Call To Action." Health Affairs, October 26, 2018.

Patient care is being compromised by increasing rates of burnout among America’s clinicians, involving not only physicians, but also nurses, advanced practice providers, and other healthcare workers. Burnout can lead, in some cases, to tragic and even fatal consequences for both clinicians and patients. Because burnout affects the majority of clinicians and suicidal ideation is more common in health professional trainees and practicing physicians than the general public, there is an urgent need for structured and systematic improvements to improve the work life and well-being of our nation’s clinicians.

Mayer, Kathryn. "Employee engagement in health benefits keeping employers up at night." Employee Benefit News, March 27, 2018.

Benefit offerings are one of the most important tools for retaining and recruiting employees—but what happens when workers don’t utilize the offerings available? And is the plethora of available resources truly improving a workforce’s health and wellbeing?

For answers, Employee Benefit News spoke to Brian Marcotte, president and CEO at National Business Group on Health, and Mike Thompson, president and CEO of the National Alliance of Healthcare Purchaser Coalitions. The two industry experts sounded off on the challenges benefits managers face when it comes to employee engagement — and the solutions they see going forward.

Bernardo, Richie. "The Real Cost of Smoking by State." WalletHub, January 17, 2018.

Smoking doesn’t just ruin your health. It can also burn a nasty hole through your wallet. WalletHub looked into the true per-person cost of smoking in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

2017

Bridges, Nicola. "Wellness at Work: The New Healthy Epidemic ." November 3, 2017.

Forget sleeping on the job getting you fired. Forward-thinking companies today encourage rest and relaxation at work, providing employees with everything from high-tech power-nap pods to silent meditation and mindfulness rooms.

A federal court on Tuesday threw out a rule allowing employers to call their workplace wellness programs “voluntary” when employees stand to lose thousands of dollars for not participating — a win for groups that challenged what they argue are coercive programs that have not been shown to improve employees’ health.

Dodd, Darren. "Wellbeing moves into the workplace." Financial Times, July 7, 2017.

As ageing populations, cost inflation and tight budgets constrain national health spending, more governments are looking to companies to fill gaps in provision that are opening up.

Corporate wellness schemes are firmly established in the US, where companies are the main funders of medical care for staff and so eager to promote better health to keep insurance premiums low. Businesses beyond the US are also keen to develop welfare strategies to reduce absenteeism and improve productivity.

Shockney, Lillie D., RN, BS, MAS, ONN-CG. "Part II: What Employers, Navigators Need to Know About Cancer’s Impact in the Workplace." Academy of Oncology Nurse and Patient Navigators, May 17, 2017.

In Part I, you learned about the incidence of cancer, its financial impact on employers, and that this impact will continue to grow in the coming decade(s). In Part II, you will get insights into what we have learned at Johns Hopkins, as well as in other workplace environments that is important for navigators to understand.

Shockney, Lillie D., RN, BS, MAS, ONN-CG. "What Employers, Navigators Need to Know about Cancer’s Impact in the Workplace." Academy of Oncology Nurse and Patient Navigators, April 20, 2017.

This expert commentary, which is divided into specific parts for you to read, emphasizes the impact that the workforce is facing when it comes to cancer today, and in the future. You will find more and more employers wanting to better understand the incidence of cancer among their employees because they are absorbing most of the cost of that cancer care—from a treatment perspective as well as a paid time off perspective.

These corporate wellness program ideas are designed to change policy and improve the work environment so it is easier for employees to adopt and maintain health behaviors.

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