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Articles of Interest: Physical Activity

An exercise prescription is also one of the front-line therapies for the prevention of many diseases.
A Field in Motion: Fighting Cancer with Exercise
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center - On Cancer

2018

Carroll, Aaron E.. "https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/19/upshot/why-standing-desks-are-overrated.html." New York Times, November 19, 2018.

We know that physical activity is good for us, and that being sedentary is not. Some have extrapolated this to mean that sitting, in general, is something to be avoided, even at work. Perhaps as a result, standing desks have become trendy and are promoted by some health officials as well as some countries.

Research, however, suggests that warnings about sitting at work are overblown, and that standing desks are overrated as a way to improve health.

We've all heard exercise helps you live longer. But a new study goes one step further, finding that a sedentary lifestyle is worse for your health than smoking, diabetes and heart disease.

"Texas A&M Leads an International Research Team in Testing a Software-based Intervention to get Workers Moving." Association of Schools & Programs of Public Health, October 16, 2018.

Fast forward 12 years and a research team led by Benden and Parag Sharma DrPH, a recent doctoral graduate of the School of Public Health, tested a new computer-based intervention aimed at increasing the number of position changes in a group of adults. Funded by OERC.org and other industry partners, the study was published in the journal Human Factors and used software that reminded users to change the position of their sit-stand desks and monitored their computer use time and desk position.

"Sedentary Lifestyle Drastically Increases Risk of Dying from Cancer." Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, April 18, 2018.

Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have once again identified a link between physical inactivity and an increased risk of mortality among cancer patients, emphasizing the health risks of a sedentary lifestyle and the importance of regular exercise as therapy for cancer patients both during and after treatment. The team is presenting the findings of their research today at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2018 in Chicago, Ill.

"Can Exercise Reduce the Risk of Cancer Recurrence?." Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, February 7, 2018.

Exercising, even at a moderate level, is one thing cancer survivors can do to lower the odds of cancer recurrence. The most consistent and largest number of studies looking at the links between exercise and cancer recurrence and overall survival have been reported for patients with breast and colorectal cancer, though increasingly other cancer types are also being studied.

2017

Hancock, Katherine. "Texas A&M Becomes a Living Laboratory for Workplace Health." Vital Record - News from Texas A&M Health Science Center, September 6, 2017.

The Ergonomics Center at the Texas A&M School of Public Health is studying if there’s a way to disrupt one of the 21st century’s health epidemics—sedentary work environments—and using volunteers at their own university as test subjects. Researchers have recruited employees of the Division of Student Affairs at Texas A&M University to see if standing desks and software prompts can improve not just their health, but their productivity, too.

Kelly, Amanda. "Walk This Way! How 5-Minute Strolls at Work Can Boost Your Mood and Cut Cravings." Johnson & Johnson, January 4, 2017.

The research has become impossible to ignore: All this sitting we’re doing is doing us in. And while we know staying glued to our office chairs is bad for our health (and our mindset), what’s the alternative?

A recent study supported by Johnson & Johnson found that when people integrated short bursts of walking into a 6-hour day of simulated office work, they felt more energized than when they simply took bathroom breaks.

2016

Regynolds, Gretchen. "Work. Walk 5 Minutes. Work.." The New York Times, December 28, 2016.

Stuck at your work desk? Standing up and walking around for five minutes every hour during the workday could lift your mood, combat lethargy without reducing focus and attention, and even dull hunger pangs, according to an instructive new study.

NCI Press Release. "Increased Physical Activity Associated with Lower Risk of 13 Types of Cancer." NIH: National Cancer Institute, May 16, 2016.

A new study of the relationship between physical activity and cancer has shown that greater levels of leisure-time physical activity were associated with a lower risk of developing 13 different types of cancer.

Silverman, Rachel Emma. "Employees Get Apple Watch for $25 (But There's a Catch)." The Wall Street Journal, March 3, 2016.

Employees at a handful of companies will soon get a sweet deal: an Apple Watch for just $25. But there is a catch—they must meet monthly fitness goals over two years or pay the full price.

2015

Gittelson, Celia. "A Field in Motion: Fighting Cancer with Exercise." Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center - On Cancer, July 21, 2015.

Using an approach that spans basic and clinical science, exercise scientist Lee Jones, Director of the Cardio-Oncology Research Program (CORP), and his team are designing and testing the effects of individually prescribed exercise training to prevent or minimize the adverse cardiovascular side effects of cancer therapy. They’re also working to answer this potentially paradigm-shifting question: Can exercise be an effective treatment for cancer itself? Here, Dr. Jones talks about some of this work.