You are here

Articles of Interest: Screening

Our trial shows that CT lung c.ancer screening offers a teachable moment for smoking cessation among high-risk groups
Can CT Lung Screening Improve Smoking Cessation Rates?
Cancer Network

2018

Santhanam, Laura. "Why aren’t more Americans getting screened for these cancers?." PBS News Hour, July 27, 2017.

Many Americans are not getting screened for cancer, putting them at risk of missing out on earlier intervention or receiving a late-stage diagnosis, according to a recent federal report.

Screening for colorectal cancer should begin at age 45 for people with an average risk, according to an updated clinical guideline from the American Cancer Society (ACS).

The recommendation lowers the age for the initial screening test by 5 years, which ACS officials acknowledged is in response to recent evidence that colorectal cancer (CRC) is occurring more often in younger people. Based on microsimulation modeling that showed a favorable risk:benefit ratio for screening at age 45, the recommendation comes with the "expectation that screening will perform similarly in adults ages 45 to 49 as it does in adults for whom screening is currently recommended."

2017

Levitan, Dave. "Can CT Lung Screening Improve Smoking Cessation Rates?." Cancer Network, August 7, 2017.

Computed tomography (CT) screening for lung cancer can lead to increased rates of smoking cessation in a high-risk population, according to a study of participants in the United Kingdom Lung Cancer Screening (UKLS) pilot trial. This “teachable moment” was particularly strong among those with a positive scan result, though it extended to those with negative results as well.