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Articles of Interest: Statistics

Although the racial gap in cancer deaths is slowly narrowing, socioeconomic inequalities are widening.
Facts & Figures 2019: US Cancer Death Rate has Dropped 27% in 25 Years
American Cancer Society

2019

CHICAGO–In patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), both current and former smoking is associated with worse treatment outcomes in treatment-naïve patients. A history of smoking is associated with molecular and cytogenetic risk factors, suggesting that it is tied to biological characteristics of the tumor rather than smoking-related comorbidities.

Jacobs, Megan. "Yes, You Still Have Smokers in Your Workplace." The EX Program, April 10, 2019.

Now that smoking is no longer the employee health issue it once was, companies can turn their attention to other wellness program strategies, right?

Unfortunately not.

Because smoking in the workplace today isn’t always obvious, that’s led some employers to believe this type of addiction isn’t a big issue anymore. Out of sight, out of mind, out of HR planning.

That misperception can be very costly on multiple levels—from direct productivity losses to higher healthcare expenditures. Even worse, it means those who do smoke won’t get the help they need.

McGinley, Laurie. "The Disturbing Links Between Too Much Weight and Several Types of Cancer." The Washington Post, April 14, 2019.
Fillon, Mike. "Tobacco Control Initiatives Cut the Number of Lung Cancer Deaths in California by 28%." CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians: Volume 69, Issue 2, January 15, 2019.

Convincing young people not to start smoking is one of the most effective ways to curb tobacco‐related illness and mortality.  Physicians and other health care practitioners play a vital role in helping patients who smoke pursue evidence‐based cessation options. Clinicians can—and should be encouraged to—engage in the policy advocacy process.

Simon, Stacy. "Facts & Figures 2019: US Cancer Death Rate has Dropped 27% in 25 Years." American Cancer Society, January 8, 2019.

The death rate from cancer in the US has declined steadily over the past 25 years, according to annual statistics reporting from the American Cancer Society. As of 2016, the cancer death rate for men and women combined had fallen 27% from its peak in 1991. This decline translates to about 1.5% per year and more than 2.6 million deaths avoided between 1991 and 2016.