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Articles of Interest: Statistics

If you're a smoker, your outcomes are worse, and there is a strong message that it's a bad (idea) to smoke.
Largest Analysis to Date Examines Link Between Smoking and Outcomes in Acute Myeloid Leukemia
cancernetwork.com

2019

Ali, PhD, Fatma Romeh M.; Maeh Al-Shawaf, MPH; Teresa W. Wang, PhD; Brian A. King, PhD, MPH. "US Adults' Attitudes Toward Lowering Nicotine Levels in Cigarettes." American Journal of Preventive Medicine, July 11, 2019.

Although cigarette smoking has declined considerably in recent decades, it remains the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the U.S., causing an estimated 480,000 deaths annually.  Two thirds of smokers want to quit smoking, yet fewer than 1 in 10 are able to quit each year.  This is primarily because cigarettes contain nicotine, which is a highly addictive drug.

 

Adams, Vice Adm. Jerome; Lt. Gen. Nadja West; Vice Adm. Forrest Faison; Lt. Gen Dorothy Hogg. "Tobacco product use threatens military readiness." Stars and Stripes, July 7, 2019.

To our servicemembers:

The surgeons general of the Air Force, Army, Navy, and United States are united in our concerns about high levels of tobacco product use among uniformed servicemembers.  Tobacco product use is a threat to the health and fitness of our forces and compromises readiness, the foundation of a strong national defense.

Harrison, Pam. "Cancer Deaths Cost U.S. Billions in Lost Earnings Each Year." MedPage Today, July 3, 2019.

Premature death from cancer each year costs the American economy a staggering amount in lost earnings, new research found.

In 2015, 8.7 million years of life were lost due to early cancer death, amounting to $94.4 billion in lost earnings, reported Farhad Islami, MD, PhD, and colleagues from the American Cancer Society in Atlanta.

CHICAGO–In patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), both current and former smoking is associated with worse treatment outcomes in treatment-naïve patients. A history of smoking is associated with molecular and cytogenetic risk factors, suggesting that it is tied to biological characteristics of the tumor rather than smoking-related comorbidities.

Jacobs, Megan. "Yes, You Still Have Smokers in Your Workplace." The EX Program, April 10, 2019.

Now that smoking is no longer the employee health issue it once was, companies can turn their attention to other wellness program strategies, right?

Unfortunately not.

Because smoking in the workplace today isn’t always obvious, that’s led some employers to believe this type of addiction isn’t a big issue anymore. Out of sight, out of mind, out of HR planning.

That misperception can be very costly on multiple levels—from direct productivity losses to higher healthcare expenditures. Even worse, it means those who do smoke won’t get the help they need.

McGinley, Laurie. "The Disturbing Links Between Too Much Weight and Several Types of Cancer." The Washington Post, April 14, 2019.
Fillon, Mike. "Tobacco Control Initiatives Cut the Number of Lung Cancer Deaths in California by 28%." CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians: Volume 69, Issue 2, January 15, 2019.

Convincing young people not to start smoking is one of the most effective ways to curb tobacco‐related illness and mortality.  Physicians and other health care practitioners play a vital role in helping patients who smoke pursue evidence‐based cessation options. Clinicians can—and should be encouraged to—engage in the policy advocacy process.

Simon, Stacy. "Facts & Figures 2019: US Cancer Death Rate has Dropped 27% in 25 Years." American Cancer Society, January 8, 2019.

The death rate from cancer in the US has declined steadily over the past 25 years, according to annual statistics reporting from the American Cancer Society. As of 2016, the cancer death rate for men and women combined had fallen 27% from its peak in 1991. This decline translates to about 1.5% per year and more than 2.6 million deaths avoided between 1991 and 2016.