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Articles of Interest: Tobacco-Free Workplace

Reducing the incidence of smoking is the single most effective public health intervention we could make as a nation.
How We Can Reduce Cancer Risk and Lower Health Costs
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: Insight

2018

To mark World Lung Cancer Day on August 1st, Cancer Network spoke with Dr. Alan Blum, Professor and Gerald Leon Wallace, MD, Endowed Chair of Family Medicine at the University of Alabama School of Medicine, where he also directs the University’s Center for the Study of Tobacco and Society, which he founded in 1999. Dr. Blum is an expert on the history of tobacco use, tobacco industry marketing, and the anti-smoking movement. He is a renowned pioneer in creative physician-led public advocacy initiatives to counter the promotion of unhealthy products and lethal lifestyles. 

—Interviewed by Anna Azvolinsky

"Tobacco-Free Policies on the Rise Across US Colleges and Universities." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, June 21, 2018.

More than twice as many U.S. college and university campuses were smoke free or tobacco free in 2017 as in 2012, according to a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Nonsmokers’ Rights Foundation (ANRF), published today in CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Junqian , Xu. "CEOs Pledge to Stub Out Smoking." China Daily, June 21, 2018.

Senior executives of companies in Shanghai’s Lujiazui district, known as the “Wall Street of China”, pledged to create a smoke-free working environment last Wednesday. Initiated by NGO the CEO Roundtable on Cancer-China and supported by the World Health Organization, the national campaign aims to encourage as many enterprises as possible in the country to say no to smoking not only inside their offices, but also in factories, on campuses and other open spaces.

The American Cancer Society, under the direction of its Center for Tobacco Control, announced the fourth round of applications for their Tobacco-Free Generation Campus Initiative (TFGCI) Grant Program to accelerate and expand the adoption and implementation of 100% smoke- and tobacco-free policies on college and university campuses across the nation.

kahn, Tamar. "Michael Bloomberg and STOP have Big Tobacco in their sights." Business Day, March 7, 2018.

Former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg is putting $20m into countering the tobacco industry’s attempts to undermine tobacco control measures, with the creation of a new global watchdog called Stopping Tobacco Organisations and Products (STOP) that will be run by his foundation, Bloomberg Philanthropies.

Eighteen colleges and universities were awarded grants from Truth Initiative® to adopt a 100 percent tobacco-free campus policy, a move that will protect more than 100,000 students and employees across 17 states.

Associated Press. "Anti-smoking plan may kill cigarettes — and save Big Tobacco." STAT, January 19, 2018.

Imagine if cigarettes were no longer addictive and smoking itself became almost obsolete; only a tiny segment of Americans still lit up. That’s the goal of an unprecedented anti-smoking plan being carefully fashioned by U.S. health officials.

Myers, Mathew L., and Robin Koval. "Commentary: Philip Morris Says It Wants to Quit Cigarettes. But It’s Just Blowing Smoke.." Fortune, January 5, 2018.

Philip Morris International (PMI)—the giant cigarette manufacturer operating in most countries excluding the U.S.—claims it wants a smoke-free future, placing advertisements in major United Kingdom newspapers earlier this week with a New Year’s resolution: “We’re trying to give up cigarettes.”

2017

"First Generation." The Rhode Island Spotlight, December 7, 2014.

Although smoking rates among college students have decreased dramatically over the past 15 years, other forms of tobacco have grown in popularity. The University of Rhode Island is one of more than 100 colleges and universities nationwide working toward becoming totally tobacco-free, getting help from Rhode Island-based non-profit CVS Health Foundation, along with The American Cancer Society. This month Jim Hummel travels to ACS headquarters in Atlanta to learn more about the program- and to Kingston, where he finds out about what’s going on locally.

Communities with strong smoke-free workplace laws have lower lung cancer rates than those with no smoke-free laws, researchers report. The new study was conducted in Kentucky, which has one of the highest lung cancer rates in the United States.

Croyle, Robert, PhD: Michele Bloch, MD, PhD. "An Important Moment in Tobacco Control." National Cancer Institute, November 28, 2017.

This past Sunday, November 26, 2017, marked a unique moment in the history of public health in the United States. On this day, in major newspapers (online and print), the three major US tobacco companies issued the first in what will be a series of five "corrective statements" about their products.

"tobacco nation: the deadly state of smoking disparity in the u.s.." The Truth Initiative, October 4, 2017.

Smoking in the U.S. has dramatically declined in the last two decades, particularly among the country’s youngest residents. In 2000, 23 percent of teens smoked cigarettes. By 2016, the number had fallen to just 6 percent. While there is much to celebrate in the reduction, the average national rate hides a significant variation found within the country. A collection of 12 contiguous states stretching from the upper Midwest to the South undermines this national achievement. In the region of the country we’ve termed “Tobacco Nation,” smoking prevalence exceeds not only the national average, but that of many of the most tobacco-dependent countries in the world.

A.W. "Smoking rooms are disappearing from hotels." The Economist, November 2, 2017.

To the list of endangered travel facilities—which includes pay phones, communal aeroplane screens and concierges—there is one more to add: smoking rooms. Even a few years ago, guests were routinely asked whether they would prefer a smoking room or not. But today fewer hotels are offering smoking rooms and those that do have a vanishingly small supply.

Close to 33 million working adults in the United States -- or roughly 20% -- regularly smoke cigarettes, vape, or use some other tobacco product, the CDC reported.

Treible, Amanda. "Temple studying how to be a tobacco-free campus." The Temple News, October 17, 2017.

The university is partnering with Thomas Jefferson University, which has been tobacco-free since 2014.

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