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Articles of Interest: Vaccines

Thanks to their extraordinary efforts, we have the potential to eliminate cervical cancer and greatly reduce other HPV-associated cancers.
NCI’s Douglas R. Lowy and John T. Schiller to receive 2017 Lasker Award

2018

"Parents See Cancer Prevention Potential as Best Reason for HPV Vaccination." American Association for Cancer Research, June 14, 2018.

Parents of adolescents believed that the potential to prevent certain types of cancer is the best reason for their children to receive the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, whereas other reasons health care providers often give were far less persuasive, according to results published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Joint statement encourages parents, young adults and physicians to take advantage of vaccination to prevent future HPV-related cancers

Michael D. Becker as told to Jo Cavallo. "HPV-Related Cancers Like Mine Are Avoidable, So Why Aren’t More Kids Being Vaccinated?." ASCO Post, May 10, 2018.

The latest news from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention about vaccination rates in the United States for human papillomavirus (HPV) is disappointing. It shows that in 2016, just 43.4% of adolescents (49.5% of females and 37.5% of males) were up-to-date with the recommended 3-dose HPV vaccination series,1 which is far below the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Healthy People 2020 goal of 80% coverage.2 Each year, HPV causes about 41,000 cases of cancer in the United States,3 and I’m sorry to say I am among its victims.

2017

Two scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) will receive the 2017 Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award for their significant research leading to the development of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines.