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Articles of Interest: Vaccines

What cancer has given me is the desire to protect others from developing preventable cancers like mine.
HPV-Related Cancers Like Mine Are Avoidable, So Why Aren’t More Kids Being Vaccinated?
ASCO Post

2019

Loftus, Eileen Glanton. "Let's End HPV-related Cancers: A Congressional Briefing." American Association for Cancer Research, June 28, 2019.

Every two minutes, a woman somewhere in the world dies of cervical cancer.

That harrowing statistic, shared by Anna R. Giuliano, PhD, founding director of the Center for Immunization and Infection Research in Cancer at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida, reflects a great frustration in public health. There is a vaccine that prevents infection with the virus that can cause cervical cancer and several other cancer types, yet worldwide, not enough people are taking advantage of it.

2018

"FDA approves expanded use of Gardasil 9 to include individuals 27 through 45 years old." US Food and Drug Administration Press Release, October 5, 2018.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a supplemental application for Gardasil 9 (Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 9-valent Vaccine, Recombinant) expanding the approved use of the vaccine to include women and men aged 27 through 45 years. Gardasil 9 prevents certain cancers and diseases caused by the nine HPV types covered by the vaccine.

"Parents See Cancer Prevention Potential as Best Reason for HPV Vaccination." American Association for Cancer Research, June 14, 2018.

Parents of adolescents believed that the potential to prevent certain types of cancer is the best reason for their children to receive the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, whereas other reasons health care providers often give were far less persuasive, according to results published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Joint statement encourages parents, young adults and physicians to take advantage of vaccination to prevent future HPV-related cancers

Michael D. Becker as told to Jo Cavallo. "HPV-Related Cancers Like Mine Are Avoidable, So Why Aren’t More Kids Being Vaccinated?." ASCO Post, May 10, 2018.

The latest news from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention about vaccination rates in the United States for human papillomavirus (HPV) is disappointing. It shows that in 2016, just 43.4% of adolescents (49.5% of females and 37.5% of males) were up-to-date with the recommended 3-dose HPV vaccination series,1 which is far below the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Healthy People 2020 goal of 80% coverage.2 Each year, HPV causes about 41,000 cases of cancer in the United States,3 and I’m sorry to say I am among its victims.

Lyman, Stewart. "The HPV Vaccine: Preventing Cancer Beats Treating It." Lyman BioPharma Consulting, LLC, March 5, 2018.

You don’t have to be an oncologist to know that fighting cancer is tough. Nearly 1.7 million Americans will be diagnosed with cancer this year, and about 600,000 will die from the disease. But here’s some good news: overall U.S. cancer deaths have been in a steep decline for over 25 years. Much of this reduction is tied to a decline in smoking, along with early detection of some cancers (e.g. colon), and more effective cancer therapies. While treatments against some particular types of cancer have advanced greatly, it’s still a disease no one wants to face. Fighting an opponent that you can never be really sure you’ve defeated challenges both the physical strength and mental fortitude of those who’ve been diagnosed. I know because I’ve been there.

 

2017

Two scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) will receive the 2017 Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award for their significant research leading to the development of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines.