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Articles of Interest

We can show a reduction in absenteeism, we can show a reduction in our health-care costs.
Can CEOs Cure Cancer?
Fast Company

2021

Migala, Jessica. "5 Early Signs of Lung Cancer." Everyday Health, February 18, 2021.

Dustin Diamond's death put a spotlight on an uncomfortable truth: Lung cancer is on the rise in never-smokers. Do you know how to spot the symptoms?

Rauf, Don. "The Latest Intel on Face Masks and the Coronavirus." Everyday Health, February 18, 2021.

Are you clear about what you should and shouldn’t be doing when it comes to wearing face masks during the pandemic? Here’s a look at the latest science on double masking, best and worst mask types, and more.

Swift, Diana. "More Support for Diet to Prevent Colorectal Cancer." MedPage Today, February 16, 2021.

— Umbrella review offers "convincing evidence" for ties between lower CRC risk and certain foods

NCI Staff. "Coronavirus Vaccines and People with Cancer: A Q&A with Dr. Steven Pergam." National Cancer Institute, February 10, 2021.

Many people being treated for cancer are asking whether they should get one of the COVID-19 vaccines. Steven Pergam, M.D., of the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, was a co-leader of a committee formed by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) that recently released recommendations on COVID-19 vaccination in cancer patients. In this Q&A, Dr. Pergam discusses some of the questions people with cancer and cancer survivors have about these vaccines.

Millard, Elizabeth. "How to Cope With Work-From-Home Burnout." Everyday Health, January 27, 2021.

Unfortunately, the end of the year doesn’t mean the pandemic-fueled work situation is over. Already burned out? Here are some tips to help you cope.

Sood, Amit, MD. "Your 10-Point Self-Care Plan for Boosting Resilience This COVID-19 Winter." Everyday Health, January 26, 2021.

Even Amit Sood, MD, one of the leading experts in combatting chronic stress and building resilience, realized he had to up his well-being routine in the face of winter’s seasonal darkness and a still rampaging COVID-19 pandemic.

Consider which ones you might be able to incorporate into your everyday routine to build resilience and enhance your health and well-being. Let these self-care practices inspire you to learn about other evidence-based strategies you might be able to add to your resilience toolkit.

NCI Staff. "Obesity May Help Tumors Survive and Grow, Mouse Study Suggests." Cancer Currents Blog, January 22, 2021.

Obesity alters many processes in the body, from how sugar is used to how the heart functions. It can also change the relationship between cancer cells and nearby immune cells in ways that help tumors survive and grow, according to a new study conducted largely in mice. 

2020

Miller, Elizabeth. "How to Not Let Pandemic Fatigue Turn Into Pandemic Burnout." Everyday Health, November 9, 2020.

As the COVID-19 health crisis drags on (and on and on), lack of an endpoint is causing frayed nerves and heightened frustration. Here are strategies that can help.

"Costs of Cancer Executive Summary." American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, 2020.

Cancer is a leading cause of death and disease in the U.S. The American Cancer Society estimates that roughly 1.8 million new cases of cancer will be diagnosed in the U.S. in 2020 and more than 16.9 million Americans living today have a cancer history.1 Not only does cancer take an enormous toll on the health of patients and survivors – it also has a tremendous financial impact.

"Large Study Confirms that HPV Vaccine Prevents Cervical Cancer." National Cancer Institute, October 15, 2020.

In what many global health leaders are calling a milestone study, researchers in Sweden have confirmed that widespread use of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine dramatically reduces the number of women who will develop cervical cancer.

Migala,Jessica. "A Cancer Expert Shares What He Eats in a Day." Everyday Health, October 6, 2020.

A prestigious Harvard-trained doctor and scientist who specializes in cancer prevention reveals his go-to snack, what he orders when dining out, and what he’ll never eat again.

Boyles, Salynn. "Even "Light" Smoking Ups Lung Cancer Risk." MedPage Today, September 9, 2020.

Social smokers were more than eight times as likely to die of lung cancer than lifetime non-smokers, and their lung cancer risk was not substantially lower than that of heavier smokers in an analysis involving close to 19,000 people.

Beusekom, Mary Van. "Depression triples in US adults amid COVID-19 stressors." CIDRAP, September 3, 2020.

COVID-19 has tripled the rate of depression in US adults in all demographic groups—especially in those with financial worries—and the rise is much higher than after previous major traumatic events, according to a study published yesterday in JAMA Network Open.

Moon, Darrell. "How CEOs Can Align Incentives So Healthcare Works for Them." Forbes, August 25, 2020.

As a hospital administrator, I sat at the top of the healthcare food chain. My job was to keep my hospital full, and my primary customers were physicians.

I was teaching the staff how to apply Dr. W. Edwards Deming’s principals of continuous quality improvement to gain accreditation. One of the first questions he asks is, “Who is the customer?” Well, who was the customer who paid for our services? It wasn’t the doctors, and it wasn’t the insurance companies; they were just the intermediary. My primary customers were business leaders willing to purchase healthcare benefits for their employees

"New Campaign Encourages All to “Keep Up The Rates” and Get Vaccinated Amidst COVID-19." National Foundation for Infectious Diesease, August 18, 2020.

Today, a group of more than 85 leading public health organizations announced the launch of a new national campaign called “Keep Up The Rates” to raise awareness about the importance of getting routine vaccinations during the COVID-19 pandemic. The campaign, led by the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID), encourages all individuals to receive recommended vaccines that may have been delayed in recent months due to the  COVID-19 pandemic.

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