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Articles of Interest

Local and state politicians should listen to these experts and take swift action. They should combat this latest menace that threatens the health of our youths and the quality of our future.
We must address teen vaping craze
Colorado Springs Gazette

2017

Levitan, Dave. "Can CT Lung Screening Improve Smoking Cessation Rates?." Cancer Network, August 7, 2017.

Computed tomography (CT) screening for lung cancer can lead to increased rates of smoking cessation in a high-risk population, according to a study of participants in the United Kingdom Lung Cancer Screening (UKLS) pilot trial. This “teachable moment” was particularly strong among those with a positive scan result, though it extended to those with negative results as well.

Zalesky, Andrew. "The hidden power of nonprofits in the struggle against cancer." MedCity News, August 2, 2017.

Not for profits are very willing to collaborate,” said Jill O’Donnell-Tormey, CEO and director of scientific affairs of the New York-based Cancer Research Institute, during a discussion at the MedCity CONVERGE Conference in Philadelphia this week.

Smoking, and tobacco use of any kind, continues to be an issue of focus due to its detriment on health and the well-being of any community. This impact can be felt throughout every facet of life up to and including the cost of healthcare as a result of tobacco use. And, despite great strides in lowering the rate of tobacco use and its health consequences, certain groups have not benefitted from this progress. Chief among them have been persons with mental illness and/or substance abuse disorders, collectively known as the behavioral health population.

Agency to pursue lowering nicotine in cigarettes to non-addictive levels and create more predictability in tobacco regulation

UI Health Care employees hit the road for bike ride across Iowa.

Many UI Health Care employees participate in the Register’s Annual Great Bicycle Ride Across Iowa (RAGBRAI) each summer, and this year’s ride is no exception.This week, The Loop is highlighting several UI Health Care staff members cyclingfrom Orange City to Lansing.

Moments after the news of Sen. John McCain’s brain tumor reached the internet, he was being pinned with the badge of the cancer warrior. And while arguably no one in the U.S. is more well-positioned to wear the fierce cancer fighter label than McCain, some patients and survivors say it exemplifies how even well-intentioned observers can rely on stock phrases that can sometimes do more harm than good.

Dodd, Darren. "Wellbeing moves into the workplace." Financial Times, July 7, 2017.

As ageing populations, cost inflation and tight budgets constrain national health spending, more governments are looking to companies to fill gaps in provision that are opening up.

Corporate wellness schemes are firmly established in the US, where companies are the main funders of medical care for staff and so eager to promote better health to keep insurance premiums low. Businesses beyond the US are also keen to develop welfare strategies to reduce absenteeism and improve productivity.

Associated Press. "No longer the hot new thing? Teen vaping falls, study says." STAT, June 15, 2017.

Teen vaping, which has been skyrocketing, fell dramatically last year in the United States.

Shockney, Lillie D., RN, BS, MAS, ONN-CG. "Part II: What Employers, Navigators Need to Know About Cancer’s Impact in the Workplace." Academy of Oncology Nurse and Patient Navigators, May 17, 2017.

In Part I, you learned about the incidence of cancer, its financial impact on employers, and that this impact will continue to grow in the coming decade(s). In Part II, you will get insights into what we have learned at Johns Hopkins, as well as in other workplace environments that is important for navigators to understand.

Tipperman, Doug, MSW. "Smoking Cessation May Improve Behavioral Health Conditions." NIH Collaborative Research on Addiction, May 10, 2017.

Cigarette smoking remains the single largest preventable cause of death and disease in the United States, responsible for over 480,000 deaths a year. Even though smoking has been decreasing overall, the smoking rate for persons with behavioral health conditions (mental and/or substance use disorders) is about twice that of the rest of the population. The rate is even higher for persons with serious mental illness or who have been in substance use disorder treatment in the past year.

Shockney, Lillie D., RN, BS, MAS, ONN-CG. "What Employers, Navigators Need to Know about Cancer’s Impact in the Workplace." Academy of Oncology Nurse and Patient Navigators, April 20, 2017.

This expert commentary, which is divided into specific parts for you to read, emphasizes the impact that the workforce is facing when it comes to cancer today, and in the future. You will find more and more employers wanting to better understand the incidence of cancer among their employees because they are absorbing most of the cost of that cancer care—from a treatment perspective as well as a paid time off perspective.

Public Law Center. "Tobacco use as a Health Equity Issue." Public Law Center, Legal Update, Spring Issue.

Despite a decline in tobacco use among U.S. adults over the past several decades, tobacco-related health disparities in both cigarette smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke have increased. This Legal Update highlights the disproportionate impact of tobacco use on vulnerable populations, including individuals suffering from behavioral health and substance use disorders, low socioeconomic populations, and other groups.

Purdy, J. McAvoy, H. Cotter, N. and Mitchell, E. "Smoke-free spaces on the the island of Ireland." The Institute of Public Health in Ireland., March 2017.

Reducing second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure has become a central component of tobacco control policies across the island of Ireland. The expansion of smoke-free spaces directly reduces exposure of children and adults and further denormalises tobacco use in a variety of social contexts. 

Terry, Michael, John Seffrin, Ph.D., K. Michael Cummings, Ph.D., Allan Erickson, and Donald Shopland. "Ending Cigarette Use by Adults in a Generation is Possible." March 2017.

Chronic exposure to tobacco smoke is the single largest cause of preventable illness and premature death in the United States today. In spite of significant progress in tobacco control over the last half century, tobacco use is still the cause of nearly one in every four deaths daily in America.

The decision by CVS Health CVS to stop selling cigarettes contributed to a drop in tobacco purchases for all retailers, new data from the drugstore giant shows.

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