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Articles of Interest

The strategy recommends a range of measures to protect people from SHS exposure, including tobacco-free campuses for government, health, education, sport and recreation facilities.
Smoke-free spaces on the the island of Ireland
The Institute of Public Health in Ireland.

2007

Hirschman, Carolyn. "Going for Gold." Employee Benefit News, September 17, 2007.

At $1 an apple, there weren't many takers at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center's cafeterias. The center's wellness team got the price lowered to 75 cents to encourage diners to eat more fresh fruit. Count it as one small step in the battle against cancer.

Min, Shirley. "Tobacco Free Company a Big Hit." WNCN-TV, August 6, 2007.

Since going totally tobacco-free last month, Quintiles says its new policy has actually helped scores of employees put cigarettes out for good.

Ready, Tinker. "Can CEOs Cure Cancer?." Fast Company, July 24, 2007.

"If you are going to have a successful corporate program, it has to be directed from the top," says William Weldon, the CEO of Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ). He could be talking about cost-cutting initiatives or a new talent-management protocol. Instead, he's talking about cancer prevention.

"Companies Heed Bush's Call to Battle." Triangle Business Journal, July 16, 2007.

Robert Ingram is accustomed to important phone calls. As vice chairman of pharmaceuticals and former president of GlaxoSmithKline, he has for years made decisions involving large sums of money and affecting thousands of employees. But when Ingram received a call one day in 2001 with a special request from former President George H.W. Bush, he knew it was more than just business as usual. He also knew he couldn't say no."When the former president calls to ask you something, you know that you're going to say yes," Ingram says with a laugh.

2006

Vollmer, Sabine. "Wellness Conquers Cancer." News & Observer, December 7, 2006.

One by one, large Triangle employers are starting to urge their employees to eat more broccoli, start exercising and stop smoking.

It's all part of the CEO Cancer Gold StandardTM, a coordinated initiative corporate America has launched against cancer. Last year the disease cost the U.S. health care system about $210 billion, according to the National Institutes of Health. Quintiles Transnational is the latest local company trying to fulfill the rigorous requirements to receive Gold Standard accreditation. SAS, the Cary software company, is another.

Laws, Jerry. "Step Up to the CEO Cancer Gold Standard." Occupational Health and Safety, May 1, 2006.

The CEO Cancer Gold Standard focuses on five critical areas that help accredited organizations maintain a culture encouraging healthy lifestyles and providing support when a cancer diagnosis is made. 

Zook, Tony. "The ROI of Wellness." Forbes, April 24, 2006.

It should come as no surprise that healthy employees boost a company’s bottom line. They experience less sick time, take fewer disability days and suffer lesser risk of premature deaths. According to the Centers for Disease Control, more than 75% of employers’ health care costs and productivity losses are related to employee lifestyle choices. And a $1 investment in wellness programs saves $3 in health care costs, according to the Wellness Council of America.

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