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Articles of Interest

... the tobacco industry is on a resurgence.
Report finds 'disturbing failure' to stop underage smoking, vaping in U.S.
NBC News

2011

Henke, Rachel M.; Ron Z. Goetzel, Janice McHugh, and Fik Isaac. "Recent Experience In Health Promotion At Johnson & Johnson: Lower Health Spending, Strong Return On Investment." Health Affairs, March 2011.

Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies introduced its worksite health promotion program in 1979. The program evolved and is still in place after more than thirty years. We evaluated the program’s effect on employees’ health risks and health care costs for the period 2002–08. Measured against similar large companies, Johnson & Johnson experienced average annual growth in total medical spending that was 3.7 percentage points lower. Company employees benefited from meaningful reductions in rates of obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, tobacco use, physical inactivity, and poor nutrition. Average annual per employee savings were $565 in 2009 dollars, producing a return on investment equal to a range of $1.88—$3.92 saved for every dollar spent on the program. Because the vast majority of US adults participate in the workforce, positive effects from similar programs could lead to better health and to savings for the nation as a whole.

Weldon, William C.. "Fix the Health Care Crisis, One Employee at a Time." Harvard Business Reivew, January-February 2011.

Johnson & Johnson has been making substantial, systematic, and effective investments in prevention for more than 30 years. We dedicate resources to prevention because, like any successful investment we’ve made, it yields steady returns. (See “What’s the Hard Return on Employee Wellness Programs?” in the December 2010 issue of HBR.) Those returns take two forms: a healthier, more productive, more committed workforce and significantly lower overall health care costs.

"Harkin Presses For Comprehensive Wellness Initiative To Fight Chronic Disease, Obesity And Reduce Health Care Costs." US Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor & Pensions, January 1, 2011.

Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA) today reintroduced major legislation to create a healthier future for America by giving our citizens access to better preventive care and consumer information to encourage healthier lifestyles.  The Healthier Lifestyles and Prevention America Act, also known as the HeLP America Act, provides all sectors of our society - child care centers, schools, workplaces, health care providers and communities - with the incentives and tools they need to reach the goal of making America a healthier place.

2009

Berry, Leonard L., PhD. "Employers of Choice Attacking Cancer." September 1, 2009.

Remarks to the CEO Roundtable on Cancer September 2009.

Daily, Linda. "Creating a Tobacco-Free Campus." National Association of College and University Business Officers, August 2009.

Banning tobacco use on campus is gaining momentum. In Pennsylvania, such a ban has taken the form of a law, which took effect in September 2008, prohibiting smoking anywhere on state-owned higher education campuses. According to the American Lung Association of Oregon, 146 colleges and universities in other states, including the University of North Dakota (UND), Grand Forks, have instituted policies calling for 100 percent tobacco-free campuses.

While the time may have come for prohibiting tobacco use on U.S. campuses, adopting effective policies requires considerable effort, wide outreach, and ongoing oversight, as UND's journey illustrates. The university adopted a formal policy in October 2007, but its efforts to support a tobacco-free environment began in 2000.

Heinen, Luann and Helen Darling . "Addressing Obesity in the Workplace: The Role of Employers." National Business Group on Health, 2009.

This article describes the employer’s perspective on the cost impact of obesity, discusses current practices in employer-sponsored wellness and weight management programs, provides examples from U.S. companies illustrating key points of employers’ leverage and opportunities, and suggests policy directions to support the expansion of employers’ initiatives, especially for smaller employers.

2008

"Obesity Costs U.S. Companies as Much as $45 Billion a Year." The Conference Board Press Release, April 9, 2008.

The rate of obesity in the United States has doubled in the last 30 years, and those extra pounds weigh on companies’ bottom lines, according to a new report from The Conference Board. Today, 34 percent of American adults fit the definition of “obese.” Obese employees cost U.S. private employers an estimated $45 billion annually in medical expenditures and work loss. 

Fitch, Kathryn and Bruce Pyenson. "Taking Stock of Wellness." Benefits Quarterly, April 1, 2008.

This article describes the many ways different employers do wellness, the evidence base for wellness, how employers should target wellness candidates, and the elements of success and failure for wellness initiatives.

Weldon, William. "The CEO's Role in Fighting Cancer." Chief Executive Magazine, January 16, 2008.

Few actions in the tenure of a CEO are more personally rewarding than saving and improving human lives. It is one reason I am so proud to be part of a company like Johnson & Johnson, a leader in health care whose products and services touch the lives of over a billion people every day. It is also the reason I have been motivated to be part of the CEO Roundtable on Cancer.

Mercer, Lynn. "Fighting cancer head-on in the workplace." Cary Magazine, March / April 20018.

In 2001, Dr. Martin J. Murphy Jr. and 13 other chief executive officers met in the board room of GlaxoSmithKline with a mandate to be bold and venturesome. 

2007

"To Avoid the Big C, Stay Small." The Economist, November 1, 2007.

EVERY day there are new stories in the tabloids about the latest link, sometimes tenuous, sometimes contradictory, between cancer and some aspect of lifestyle. If this is a recipe for confusion, then the antidote is probably a weighty new tome from the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF). It is the most rigorous study so far on the links between food, physical activity and cancer—and sets out the important sources of risk.

Hirschman, Carolyn. "Going for Gold." Employee Benefit News, September 17, 2007.

At $1 an apple, there weren't many takers at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center's cafeterias. The center's wellness team got the price lowered to 75 cents to encourage diners to eat more fresh fruit. Count it as one small step in the battle against cancer.

Min, Shirley. "Tobacco Free Company a Big Hit." WNCN-TV, August 6, 2007.

Since going totally tobacco-free last month, Quintiles says its new policy has actually helped scores of employees put cigarettes out for good.

Ready, Tinker. "Can CEOs Cure Cancer?." Fast Company, July 24, 2007.

"If you are going to have a successful corporate program, it has to be directed from the top," says William Weldon, the CEO of Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ). He could be talking about cost-cutting initiatives or a new talent-management protocol. Instead, he's talking about cancer prevention.

"Companies Heed Bush's Call to Battle." Triangle Business Journal, July 16, 2007.

Robert Ingram is accustomed to important phone calls. As vice chairman of pharmaceuticals and former president of GlaxoSmithKline, he has for years made decisions involving large sums of money and affecting thousands of employees. But when Ingram received a call one day in 2001 with a special request from former President George H.W. Bush, he knew it was more than just business as usual. He also knew he couldn't say no."When the former president calls to ask you something, you know that you're going to say yes," Ingram says with a laugh.

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