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Because tobacco-induced illnesses and deaths almost always strike people in the prime of life, their negative economic impact on the nation is huge, due to lost productivity and extraordinary health care costs.
Ending Cigarette Use by Adults in a Generation is Possible

2019

Huizhi, Chen. "WeChat groups to help smokers quit." Shine News, December 18, 2019.

A free program for people wanting to quit smoking was launched on Wednesday by Shanghai Pilot Health Promotion Center, a Shanghai-based non-governmental organization focused on cancer prevention.

This week Discovery Education, the leading provider of digital content and professional development for K – 12 classrooms nationwide, in partnership with CATCH Global Foundation, a public charity dedicated to the development and dissemination of evidence-based health programs, and the CVS Health Foundation, the philanthropic arm of CVS Health, launched Be Vape Free, a nationwide initiative to provide standards-aligned, no-cost, e-cigarette prevention resources for educators teaching grades 5 – 12. Be Vape Free will serve to expand the use of CATCH My Breath, a proven effective vaping prevention program, to combat the growing vaping epidemic by arming educators, parents, and communities with easy-to-use tools that will help students make smart, informed, and healthy choices for life. The CVS Health Foundation is providing a $3 million commitment to fund this multi-year collaboration.

Researchers from Queen’s University Belfast have discovered that bacteria often found in the lungs became more harmful and caused increased inflammation when they were exposed to e-cigarette vape.

The results of the three-year study, published today (Wednesday 18 December) in Respiratory Research, show that  this increase in lung inflammation is due to  bacteria made more virulent by exposure to e-cigarette vapour.

Dr Deirdre Gilpin, researcher and lecturer from the School of Pharmacy at Queen’s University and lead author of the research explains: “There is currently a knowledge gap about whether vaping is harmful, or less harmful than smoking tobacco.

Rawson, Jeff. "I nearly died from vaping and you could too." The Boston Globe, December 16, 2019.

It seemed like food poisoning.

All weekend, I lay in bed with such abdominal pain that I cried, moaned, even yelled. It was the worst stomach bug I had experienced in my 40 years. By Sunday, I began to improve. I held down fluids, I ate a banana. But that night I grew sicker. No matter how much water and sports beverage I drank, my mouth dried out and my fever rose. Instead of immersive fever dreams, my dreams were of a single object, receding into the distance, emptiness all around me.

"Stricter Alcohol Policies Related to Lower Risk of Cancer." Boston Medical Center, December 4, 2019.

BOSTON – In a new study, researchers at Boston Medical Center and Boston University have uncovered a new association between more restrictive alcohol policies and lower rates of cancer mortality.

Alcohol consumption has long been related to a number of health conditions, but has recently been identified as an emerging risk factor for developing at least seven different types of cancer. Previous studies have estimated approximately 20,000 cancer deaths are attributable to alcohol in the United States annually. However, no previous studies have looked into whether stronger (i.e. more restrictive) alcohol policies are associated with rates of alcohol-attributable cancers in the U.S.

Von Drehle, David. "This vape craze should never have been allowed to happen." The Washington Post, November 29, 2019.

Todd White is superintendent of the Blue Valley School District in Johnson County, Kan. It’s an enviable position. The Blue Valley schools serve a relatively upscale population in the suburbs of Kansas City. On an average day, more than 95 percent of Blue Valley students are in school. The graduation rate is 97 percent. The dropout rate, less than 1 percent. Every student in grade three and above has a computer.

Yet White confessed recently that his prosperous district is in the midst of an epidemic. “In my 35 years in education, I’ve never seen anything that has been so rapid and devastating to the health and well-being of students, nor so disruptive to the daily work of teachers and administrators in educating our students,” he said of the crisis. What wreaks such havoc?

Vaping.

Rupp, Lindsey and Riley Griffin. "Duke University Was Built on a Cigarette Fortune. Now It May Ban Vaping On Its Campus." Bloomberg, November 23, 2019.

At Duke Unversity, at the epicenter of North Carolina’s tobacco country, a tense showdown over college vaping and its health risks is roiling the campus.

Fried, Ina; Mike Allen. "Apple to remove vaping apps from store." Axios, November 15, 2019.

Amid growing health concerns over e-cigarettes, Apple will remove all 181 vaping-related apps from its mobile App Store this morning, Axios has learned.

Why it matters: The move comes after at least 42 people have died from vaping-related lung illness, per the CDC. Most of those people had been using cartridges containing THC, though some exclusively used nicotine cartridges.

NCI Staff. "Prescribing exercise as cancer treatment: a conversation with Dr. Kathryn Schmitz." National Cancer Institute, November 12, 2019.

On October 16, 2019, an expert panel convened by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) released updated guidance and recommendations on the role of physical activity and exercise in cancer prevention and survivorship. The panel was co-chaired by Kathryn Schmitz, Ph.D., M.P.H., of the Department of Public Health Sciences at the Penn State College of Medicine, and Charles Matthews, Ph.D., of NCI’s Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics.

The recommendations, as outlined in three related publications, are the products of the panel’s comprehensive review of the scientific evidence on physical activity and cancer. In this conversation, Dr. Schmitz, immediate past-president of ACSM, discusses the research findings connecting physical activity with improved cancer outcomes and what these new guidelines mean for health care providers and survivors.

Lou, Nicole. "Vaping Worse for Heart than Cigarettes?." MedPage Today, November 12, 2019.

E-cigarette smokers were worse off than conventional cigarette smokers in terms of coronary microvascular vascular function, researchers found in a small study.

Raeke, Meagan. "E-cigarettes: Understandardized, under-regulated, under-studied - safety unknown." MD Anderson Cancer Center, November 4, 2019.

The recent outbreak of lung injury and death associated with e-cigarettes and vaping has led to a renewed scrutiny of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS). While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are leading an investigation into e-cigarette, or vaping, associated lung injury (EVALI), available data on the short- and long-term health effects of ENDS are limited, says Ernest Hawk, M.D., division head and vice president of Cancer Prevention & Population Sciences.  

Bowdish, PhD, Lawrence; Yagmur Cosar. "Transforming Global Health: Cross-Sector Partnership to Advance the SDGs." U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation, October 30, 2019.

The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are a global effort to address some of the most pressing challenges facing the world. Some of these goals, particularly SDG 3 (Good Health and Well-Being), deal directly with the health of individuals and communities, but better societal health underpins virtually all 17 SDGs. The success of these goals requires cross-sector partnerships, finding new, innovative solutions, and rethinking how the private sector and all stakeholders leverage their strengths to address global health challenges.

A study recently published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society suggests that women who use e-cigarettes may face difficulties in becoming pregnant, and that exposure to vaping could cause permanent health complications for the fetus [1]. Dr. Mark Trolice, Director of Fertility CARE: The IVF Center, notes that smoking regular cigarettes is already contraindicated for women seeking to become pregnant, and that vaping should be as well. "E-cigarettes are probably just as harmful to pregnancy and fertility as traditional cigarettes because they both have similar amounts of nicotine," Dr. Trolice said. "There is a misconception that e-cigarettes are safe to use during pregnancy. Anyone on their fertility journey should avoid the use of nicotine altogether."

Megan Jacobs, MPH. "More companies starting to offer virtual support to parents with kids who vape." The ex Program, October 21, 2019.

As you’ve probably seen by now in the news, vaping rates among teenagers are increasing at an alarming rate. From 2017 to 2018, e-cigarette use among high school students increased a whopping 78%! In 2019, 27.5% of high school students—more than 1 in 4—are vaping.

E-cigarette use among middle school students also jumped 48% from 2017 to 2018. And, according to a study in the Journal of the American Medical Associatione-cigarette use among 18-24-year-olds increased 60% from 2017 to 2018.

Collins, Dr. Francis. "Panel finds exercise may lower cancer risk, improve outcomes." NIH Director's Blog, October 16, 2019.

Exercise can work wonders for your health, including strengthening muscles and bones, and boosting metabolism, mood, and memory skills. Now comes word that staying active may also help to lower your odds of developing cancer. 

After reviewing the scientific evidence, a panel of experts recently concluded that physical activity is associated with reduced risks for seven common types of cancer: colon, breast, kidney, endometrial, bladder, stomach, and esophageal adenocarcinoma. What’s more, the experts found that exercise—both before and after a cancer diagnosis—was linked to improved survival among people with breast, colorectal, or prostate cancers.

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