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Articles of Interest

The new e-cigarette quit program will deliver tailored messages via text that give age-appropriate quitting advice, including information about nicotine replacement therapy.
Quitting e-cigarettes
truth initiative

2018

The Gazette Editorial Board. "We must address teen vaping craze." Colorado Springs Gazette, December 19, 2018.

Teen consumption of nicotine vapor throughout the country rose 10 percent in the past 30 days over a similar period a year ago. Tuesday’s announcement by the National Institute for Drug Abuse marks the largest increase of any substance use in the agency’s 43 years of tracking.

The U.S. Surgeon General issued an advisory Tuesday urging new local restrictions including taxes and indoor vaping bans to combat youth e-cigarette use, a pivotal development given the office's global stature on tobacco enforcement. 

"Surgeon General’s e-cigarette advisory brings necessary attention to ‘epidemic’ in youth." University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, December 18, 2018.

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center supports the United States Surgeon General’s actions to inform youth, parents, teachers and health professionals about the “epidemic” rates of e-cigarette use among youth and the associated health risks for young people. In order to protect the health of future generations, MD Anderson is committed to programs and actions that prevent teens and young adults from using these products.

Young, Kelly. "Teen Nicotine Vaping Doubles in Single Year." New England Journal of Medicine, December 17, 2018.

Twice as many adolescents reported vaping nicotine in 2018 as in 2017, according to correspondence in the New England Journal of Medicine. The authors say it's the largest absolute increase ever recorded in the 44-year history of the study, which surveys 8th through 12th graders about substance use.

Carroll, Aaron E.. "Are You Sitting Down? Standing Desks Are Overrated." New York Times, November 19, 2018.

We know that physical activity is good for us, and that being sedentary is not. Some have extrapolated this to mean that sitting, in general, is something to be avoided, even at work. Perhaps as a result, standing desks have become trendy and are promoted by some health officials as well as some countries.

Research, however, suggests that warnings about sitting at work are overblown, and that standing desks are overrated as a way to improve health.

Lyles, Ashley. "National Exercise Guidelines Now Say 'Just Move' ." MedPage Today, November 12, 2018.

Any physical activity will help, more is better, and it helps for a wider range of health outcomes than previously noted, according to new U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) guidelines.

Gov. John Hickenlooper took new steps Friday to curb the use of e-cigarettes by teenagers in Colorado, signing an executive order that, among other things, directs state regulators to increase checks of retailers to make sure they are not selling the devices to underage shoppers.

Kishmore, Sandeep, et al. "Making The Case For The Chief Wellness Officer In America’s Health Systems: A Call To Action." Health Affairs, October 26, 2018.

Patient care is being compromised by increasing rates of burnout among America’s clinicians, involving not only physicians, but also nurses, advanced practice providers, and other healthcare workers. Burnout can lead, in some cases, to tragic and even fatal consequences for both clinicians and patients. Because burnout affects the majority of clinicians and suicidal ideation is more common in health professional trainees and practicing physicians than the general public, there is an urgent need for structured and systematic improvements to improve the work life and well-being of our nation’s clinicians.

Reedy, Jill, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D.. "Studying “Total Diet” and Its Impact on Health, Including Cancer Risk." National Cancer Institute, October 25, 2018.

Does what we eat and drink affect our risk of developing cancer?

We've all heard exercise helps you live longer. But a new study goes one step further, finding that a sedentary lifestyle is worse for your health than smoking, diabetes and heart disease.

"Texas A&M Leads an International Research Team in Testing a Software-based Intervention to get Workers Moving." Association of Schools & Programs of Public Health, October 16, 2018.

Fast forward 12 years and a research team led by Benden and Parag Sharma DrPH, a recent doctoral graduate of the School of Public Health, tested a new computer-based intervention aimed at increasing the number of position changes in a group of adults. Funded by OERC.org and other industry partners, the study was published in the journal Human Factors and used software that reminded users to change the position of their sit-stand desks and monitored their computer use time and desk position.

Agency seeks more information from companies as it continues to pursue its Youth Tobacco Prevention Plan amid evidence of sharply rising e-cigarette use among kids

Azar, Alex M. and Scott Gottlieb. "We cannot let e-cigarettes become an on-ramp for teenage addiction." Washington Post, October 11, 2018.

At the Department of Health and Human Services, we are deeply concerned about the risks that e-cigarettes pose for children, given how quickly teenage use of these products has accelerated. Using a small battery to heat a liquid that contains nicotine, e-cigarettes turn the liquid into an inhalable vapor. Since 2014, they have been the most popular nicotine product among American teenagers.

"FDA approves expanded use of Gardasil 9 to include individuals 27 through 45 years old." US Food and Drug Administration Press Release, October 5, 2018.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a supplemental application for Gardasil 9 (Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 9-valent Vaccine, Recombinant) expanding the approved use of the vaccine to include women and men aged 27 through 45 years. Gardasil 9 prevents certain cancers and diseases caused by the nine HPV types covered by the vaccine.

Ghosh, Tista. "Vaping is tobacco’s new guise to target Colorado kids." The Denver Post, August 3, 2018.

Think tobacco use has disappeared as a threat to our children’s health? It hasn’t. About one in three Colorado high school students are using nicotine. Most of them don’t smoke cigarettes or use chew tobacco, they’re doing something new. It’s called vaping.

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