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Articles of Interest

Vaping clouds the picture, literally and figuratively, because young people may not know what they are inhaling.
Decline in teen smoking offset by rising popularity of vaping
Truth Initiative

2019

Rupp, Lindsey and Riley Griffin. "Duke University Was Built on a Cigarette Fortune. Now It May Ban Vaping On Its Campus." Bloomberg, November 23, 2019.

At Duke Unversity, at the epicenter of North Carolina’s tobacco country, a tense showdown over college vaping and its health risks is roiling the campus.

Fried, Ina; Mike Allen. "Apple to remove vaping apps from store." Axios, November 15, 2019.

Amid growing health concerns over e-cigarettes, Apple will remove all 181 vaping-related apps from its mobile App Store this morning, Axios has learned.

Why it matters: The move comes after at least 42 people have died from vaping-related lung illness, per the CDC. Most of those people had been using cartridges containing THC, though some exclusively used nicotine cartridges.

Lou, Nicole. "Vaping Worse for Heart than Cigarettes?." MedPage Today, November 12, 2019.

E-cigarette smokers were worse off than conventional cigarette smokers in terms of coronary microvascular vascular function, researchers found in a small study.

NCI Staff. "Prescribing exercise as cancer treatment: a conversation with Dr. Kathryn Schmitz." National Cancer Institute, November 12, 2019.

On October 16, 2019, an expert panel convened by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) released updated guidance and recommendations on the role of physical activity and exercise in cancer prevention and survivorship. The panel was co-chaired by Kathryn Schmitz, Ph.D., M.P.H., of the Department of Public Health Sciences at the Penn State College of Medicine, and Charles Matthews, Ph.D., of NCI’s Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics.

The recommendations, as outlined in three related publications, are the products of the panel’s comprehensive review of the scientific evidence on physical activity and cancer. In this conversation, Dr. Schmitz, immediate past-president of ACSM, discusses the research findings connecting physical activity with improved cancer outcomes and what these new guidelines mean for health care providers and survivors.

Raeke, Meagan. "E-cigarettes: Understandardized, under-regulated, under-studied - safety unknown." MD Anderson Cancer Center, November 4, 2019.

The recent outbreak of lung injury and death associated with e-cigarettes and vaping has led to a renewed scrutiny of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS). While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are leading an investigation into e-cigarette, or vaping, associated lung injury (EVALI), available data on the short- and long-term health effects of ENDS are limited, says Ernest Hawk, M.D., division head and vice president of Cancer Prevention & Population Sciences.  

Bowdish, PhD, Lawrence; Yagmur Cosar. "Transforming Global Health: Cross-Sector Partnership to Advance the SDGs." U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation, October 30, 2019.

The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are a global effort to address some of the most pressing challenges facing the world. Some of these goals, particularly SDG 3 (Good Health and Well-Being), deal directly with the health of individuals and communities, but better societal health underpins virtually all 17 SDGs. The success of these goals requires cross-sector partnerships, finding new, innovative solutions, and rethinking how the private sector and all stakeholders leverage their strengths to address global health challenges.

Kaufman, Pamela. "Can What You Eat Beat Disease? It May, and an Acclaimed Researcher Shares How." Everyday Health, October 26, 2019.

In an exclusive interview with Everyday Health, William W. Li, MD, author of the book 'Eat to Beat Disease,' discusses how nutrition can play a role in preventing and fighting disease.

A study recently published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society suggests that women who use e-cigarettes may face difficulties in becoming pregnant, and that exposure to vaping could cause permanent health complications for the fetus [1]. Dr. Mark Trolice, Director of Fertility CARE: The IVF Center, notes that smoking regular cigarettes is already contraindicated for women seeking to become pregnant, and that vaping should be as well. "E-cigarettes are probably just as harmful to pregnancy and fertility as traditional cigarettes because they both have similar amounts of nicotine," Dr. Trolice said. "There is a misconception that e-cigarettes are safe to use during pregnancy. Anyone on their fertility journey should avoid the use of nicotine altogether."

Megan Jacobs, MPH. "More companies starting to offer virtual support to parents with kids who vape." The ex Program, October 21, 2019.

As you’ve probably seen by now in the news, vaping rates among teenagers are increasing at an alarming rate. From 2017 to 2018, e-cigarette use among high school students increased a whopping 78%! In 2019, 27.5% of high school students—more than 1 in 4—are vaping.

E-cigarette use among middle school students also jumped 48% from 2017 to 2018. And, according to a study in the Journal of the American Medical Associatione-cigarette use among 18-24-year-olds increased 60% from 2017 to 2018.

Collins, Dr. Francis. "Panel finds exercise may lower cancer risk, improve outcomes." NIH Director's Blog, October 16, 2019.

Exercise can work wonders for your health, including strengthening muscles and bones, and boosting metabolism, mood, and memory skills. Now comes word that staying active may also help to lower your odds of developing cancer. 

After reviewing the scientific evidence, a panel of experts recently concluded that physical activity is associated with reduced risks for seven common types of cancer: colon, breast, kidney, endometrial, bladder, stomach, and esophageal adenocarcinoma. What’s more, the experts found that exercise—both before and after a cancer diagnosis—was linked to improved survival among people with breast, colorectal, or prostate cancers.

NEW ORLEANS—Vaping is not a low-risk substitute for smoking cigarettes, according to researcher Charlie Lin, MD, who authored a case study of a 34-year-old former smoker diagnosed with granulomatosis attributed to two months of electronic cigarette use. Dr. Lin will present his case study at the CHEST Annual Meeting 2019 in New Orleans.

“This case of granulomatosis secondary to electronic cigarette use exemplifies an unintended consequence of ‘vaping,’” Dr. Lin wrote. Granulomas destroy healthy tissue and inflame blood vessels, which can limit blood flow to organs including the lungs.

Electronic cigarettes vaporize liquids for inhalation to simulate the combustion of smoking traditional cigarettes. Until recently, e-cigarettes, with their lack of combustion-produced toxins, were thought to be lower risk than traditional cigarettes. Consequently, e-cigarettes have been heralded as having a perceived role in smoking cessation.

Rodriguez, Megan. "Texas A&M to implement tobacco-free campus policy in January." The Eagle, October 13, 2019.

Texas A&M University will implement a tobacco-free policy in January, using a $20,000 grant from the American Cancer Society to help fund the effort. 

Recently, I was approached on London Bridge by an attractive sales woman with samples of what looked like sweet containers. On closer inspection, they were not confectionary, but instead turned out to be nicotine vape samples. I was not asked if I was over 18 (I look young for someone in their mid-20s), and I was not asked if I was trying to quit smoking or had a previous history of substance abuse. I politely declined.

The marketing for nicotine vapes around the world has been, by and large, poorly regulated, and it is commonplace in London to see teenagers with their hands on vapes blowing pillows of smoke. While 10 years ago it would have been more common to see teenagers experimenting with their first cigarettes under the cover of trees and park benches, the seemingly more accessible nature of vapes has started to replace this underage rite of passage with something more blatant. In the United States, the Federal Court has launched an investigation into Juul, a large nicotine vape producer. The global regulation of vaping, which contains nicotine, a substance found to be nearly as addictive as heroin, should be more common than it is now.

Bassett, Mike. "How to get more men in breast cancer trials?." MedPage Today, October 8, 2019.

The FDA recently drafted new recommendations encouraging the inclusion of more men in breast cancer clinical trials.

The industry draft guidance urges that eligibility for breast cancer drugs should include both men and women, and that there should be a scientific rationale included in a trial protocol when men are excluded from trials.

Boyles, Salynn. "Smoking Cessation Tx Highly Effective in Cancer Patients." MedPage Today, September 29, 2019.

Smokers with cancer who participated in a comprehensive tobacco cessation program achieved high sustained quit rates, and they were just as likely as patients without cancer to successfully stop smoking cigarettes, a new study finds.

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