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Articles of Interest

Cancer's greatest death rate coincides with our wage-bearing years, so its workplace impact is enormous.
Step Up to the CEO Cancer Gold Standard
Occupational Health and Safety

2017

Communities with strong smoke-free workplace laws have lower lung cancer rates than those with no smoke-free laws, researchers report. The new study was conducted in Kentucky, which has one of the highest lung cancer rates in the United States.

Croyle, Robert, PhD: Michele Bloch, MD, PhD. "An Important Moment in Tobacco Control." National Cancer Institute, November 28, 2017.

This past Sunday, November 26, 2017, marked a unique moment in the history of public health in the United States. On this day, in major newspapers (online and print), the three major US tobacco companies issued the first in what will be a series of five "corrective statements" about their products.

Smoking rates have decreased substantially in the United States over the past several decades. But, unfortunately, too many smokers who are diagnosed with cancer don’t quit smoking.

Healthier beverage choices are becoming more popular among the U.S. population, a new study found.

Brody, Jane E. "The Growing Toll of Our Ever-Expanding Waistlines." New York Times, November 13, 2017.

Many cancer deaths were averted after millions quit lighting up, but they are now rising because even greater numbers are unable to keep their waistlines in check.

Bridges, Nicola. "Wellness at Work: The New Healthy Epidemic ." November 3, 2017.

Forget sleeping on the job getting you fired. Forward-thinking companies today encourage rest and relaxation at work, providing employees with everything from high-tech power-nap pods to silent meditation and mindfulness rooms.

"tobacco nation: the deadly state of smoking disparity in the u.s.." The Truth Initiative, October 4, 2017.

Smoking in the U.S. has dramatically declined in the last two decades, particularly among the country’s youngest residents. In 2000, 23 percent of teens smoked cigarettes. By 2016, the number had fallen to just 6 percent. While there is much to celebrate in the reduction, the average national rate hides a significant variation found within the country. A collection of 12 contiguous states stretching from the upper Midwest to the South undermines this national achievement. In the region of the country we’ve termed “Tobacco Nation,” smoking prevalence exceeds not only the national average, but that of many of the most tobacco-dependent countries in the world.

A.W. "Smoking rooms are disappearing from hotels." The Economist, November 2, 2017.

To the list of endangered travel facilities—which includes pay phones, communal aeroplane screens and concierges—there is one more to add: smoking rooms. Even a few years ago, guests were routinely asked whether they would prefer a smoking room or not. But today fewer hotels are offering smoking rooms and those that do have a vanishingly small supply.

Close to 33 million working adults in the United States -- or roughly 20% -- regularly smoke cigarettes, vape, or use some other tobacco product, the CDC reported.

"Are e-cigarettes ‘safer’ than regular cigarettes?." UNC Health Care and UNC School of Medicine Newsroom, October 20, 2017.

UNC School of Medicine researchers lead new study showing that e-cigarettes trigger unique and potentially damaging immune responses in human airways.

Treible, Amanda. "Temple studying how to be a tobacco-free campus." The Temple News, October 17, 2017.

The university is partnering with Thomas Jefferson University, which has been tobacco-free since 2014.

CVS Health. "By the Numbers: Addressing Tobacco Use on College Campuses." CVS Health, September 18, 2017.
"2017 AACR Cancer Progress Report." American Association for Cancer Research, September 13, 2017.

With the number of cancer cases diagnosed in the United States rising every year, it is vital that the AACR increases public awareness about cancer and the importance of research for improving health and saving lives from cancer. The annual AACR Cancer Progress Report is a cornerstone of these educational efforts and the AACR’s work to advocate for increased funding for the federal agencies that are vital for fueling progress against cancer— in particular, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Two scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) will receive the 2017 Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award for their significant research leading to the development of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines. 

Hancock, Katherine. "Texas A&M Becomes a Living Laboratory for Workplace Health." Vital Record - News from Texas A&M Health Science Center, September 6, 2017.

The Ergonomics Center at the Texas A&M School of Public Health is studying if there’s a way to disrupt one of the 21st century’s health epidemics—sedentary work environments—and using volunteers at their own university as test subjects. Researchers have recruited employees of the Division of Student Affairs at Texas A&M University to see if standing desks and software prompts can improve not just their health, but their productivity, too.

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