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Articles of Interest

Patient (and public) engagement is also key to the recommendation to implement evidence-based approaches to prevention.
A U.S. “Cancer Moonshot” to accelerate cancer research
Science Magazine

2016

NCI Press Release. "Increased Physical Activity Associated with Lower Risk of 13 Types of Cancer." NIH: National Cancer Institute, May 16, 2016.

A new study of the relationship between physical activity and cancer has shown that greater levels of leisure-time physical activity were associated with a lower risk of developing 13 different types of cancer.

Nather, David; Dylan Scott. "FDA issues sweeping regulations for e-cigarettes for first time." STAT, May 5, 2016.

The FDA issued a sweeping set of tobacco rules that would regulate e-cigarettes for the first time.

Silverman, Rachel Emma. "Employees Get Apple Watch for $25 (But There's a Catch)." The Wall Street Journal, March 3, 2016.

Employees at a handful of companies will soon get a sweet deal: an Apple Watch for just $25. But there is a catch—they must meet monthly fitness goals over two years or pay the full price.

Begley, Shannon. "Do workplace wellness programs improve employees’ health?." STAT, February 19, 2016.

Gut Check is a periodic look at health claims made by studies, newsmakers, or conventional wisdom. We ask: Should you believe this?

The Claim: Workplace wellness programs improve employees’ health and reduce the incidence of preventable disease.

Rapaport, Lisa. "Smoking cessation pill no better than nicotine patches or lozenges." Reuters Health News, January 26, 2016.

Smoking cessation pills aren’t any better than nicotine patches or lozenges at helping people successfully quit, a U.S. study suggests. 

Goetzel, Ron. "Yet Another Reason to Build a Culture of Health at Your Company." Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, January 6, 2016.

For decades, proponents of workplace health promotion (wellness) programs have articulated the many factors justifying a business case for investment in these initiatives.  

2015

Sipek, Sarah. "Through Hell and Well." Workforce, December 25, 2015.

Bill Baun is the wellness officer at MD Anderson Cancer Center. He has been working in corporate wellness since its earliest days, and despite his own battle against cancer, his input continues to shape the wellness field today.

Benz, Edward J., Jr., MD. "How We Can Reduce Cancer Risk and Lower Health Costs." Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: Insight, December 18, 2015 | Updated May 22, 2017.

Yesterday, the Boston Board of Health approved a policy raising the minimum age for buying tobacco from 18 to 21. This is great news. As a former smoker, I know how easy it was to pick up the habit at age 18. I know how quickly nicotine becomes addictive, and I know how hard it was to finally quit smoking at age 37. As a physician and president of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, I see daily the heartbreak and havoc that tobacco wreaks on patients, families and health care costs.

CVS Health (NYSE: CVS) today marked the first anniversary of ending tobacco sales at CVS/pharmacy by releasing new data showing a measurable reduction in cigarette purchases over the past year. The company also announced it is renewing its commitment to creating a tobacco-free generation througha joint initiative between CVS Health, its Foundation and Scholastic to launch a schoolbased tobacco-prevention program.

Implementing comprehensive tobacco policies in the workplace can rapidly reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, gradually reduce the additional risk for cancers, improve worker productivity and therefore reduce the direct and indirect medical costs of tobacco use.

Gittelson, Celia. "A Field in Motion: Fighting Cancer with Exercise." Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center - On Cancer, July 21, 2015.

Using an approach that spans basic and clinical science, exercise scientist Lee Jones, Director of the Cardio-Oncology Research Program (CORP), and his team are designing and testing the effects of individually prescribed exercise training to prevent or minimize the adverse cardiovascular side effects of cancer therapy. They’re also working to answer this potentially paradigm-shifting question: Can exercise be an effective treatment for cancer itself? Here, Dr. Jones talks about some of this work.

2014

CNBC interview with Mr. Christopher A. Viehbacher, Chief Executive Officer of Sanofi and chairman of the CEO Roundtable on Cancer.

Bryla, Jacy. "Cancer Presents Complex Workplace Challenges—According to IBI Research." Integrated Benefits Institute, March 26, 2014.

Cancer typically costs employers about $19,000 annually per 100 employees in lost work time and medical treatments. Lost work time and underperformance at work (presenteeism) due to cancer costs employers $10,000 per 100 workers—more than half of the total costs associated with cancer—and medical and pharmacy treatments cost about $9,100. Employees with cancer are absent 3.8 more days per year than workers without cancer, and also lose the equivalent of 1.8 more days per year to presenteeism.

Richtell, Matt. "Selling a Poison by the Barrel: Liquid Nicotine for E-Cigarettes." NY Times, March 23, 2014.

A dangerous new form of a powerful stimulant is hitting markets nationwide, for sale by the vial, the gallon and even the barrel. The drug is nicotine, in its potent, liquid form — extracted from tobacco and tinctured with a cocktail of flavorings, colorings and assorted chemicals to feed the fast-growing electronic cigarette industry.

Sherry, Mike. "KC employers urged to help fight cancer." Kansas Health Institute, February 13, 2014.

Fighting the nation’s second leading cause of death is a smart move for companies because it helps keep their workers fit and productive, a top U.S. health official with area connections told a business audience Tuesday at the Kauffman Foundation Conference Center.

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