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Articles of Interest

...we intend to clear the market of flavored e-cigarettes to reverse the deeply concerning epidemic of youth e-cigarette use...
Trump administration combating epidemic of youth e-cigarette use with plan to clear market of unauthorized, non-tobacco flavored e-cigarette products
US Food & Drug Administration

2018

Joint statement encourages parents, young adults and physicians to take advantage of vaccination to prevent future HPV-related cancers

Pearson, Anthony, MD. "E-Cigs: How Much Help vs How Much Harm? ." MedPage Today, May, 27, 2018.

Hooking kids on nicotine a steep price to pay for helping some smokers quit, says Skeptical Cardiologist.

Screening for colorectal cancer should begin at age 45 for people with an average risk, according to an updated clinical guideline from the American Cancer Society (ACS).

The recommendation lowers the age for the initial screening test by 5 years, which ACS officials acknowledged is in response to recent evidence that colorectal cancer (CRC) is occurring more often in younger people. Based on microsimulation modeling that showed a favorable risk:benefit ratio for screening at age 45, the recommendation comes with the "expectation that screening will perform similarly in adults ages 45 to 49 as it does in adults for whom screening is currently recommended."

A high body-mass index (BMI) as well as gaining large amounts of weight irrespective of starting BMI both contribute to obesity-related cancers, although not necessarily the same ones, a large epidemiological study from Norway suggested.

Michael D. Becker as told to Jo Cavallo. "HPV-Related Cancers Like Mine Are Avoidable, So Why Aren’t More Kids Being Vaccinated?." ASCO Post, May 10, 2018.

The latest news from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention about vaccination rates in the United States for human papillomavirus (HPV) is disappointing. It shows that in 2016, just 43.4% of adolescents (49.5% of females and 37.5% of males) were up-to-date with the recommended 3-dose HPV vaccination series,1 which is far below the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Healthy People 2020 goal of 80% coverage.2 Each year, HPV causes about 41,000 cases of cancer in the United States,3 and I’m sorry to say I am among its victims.

The American Cancer Society, under the direction of its Center for Tobacco Control, announced the fourth round of applications for their Tobacco-Free Generation Campus Initiative (TFGCI) Grant Program to accelerate and expand the adoption and implementation of 100% smoke- and tobacco-free policies on college and university campuses across the nation.

"Sedentary Lifestyle Drastically Increases Risk of Dying from Cancer." Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, April 18, 2018.

Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have once again identified a link between physical inactivity and an increased risk of mortality among cancer patients, emphasizing the health risks of a sedentary lifestyle and the importance of regular exercise as therapy for cancer patients both during and after treatment. The team is presenting the findings of their research today at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2018 in Chicago, Ill.

Data on e-cigarettes show that they are the most popular tobacco products among youth, with more than 11 percent reporting in 2016 that they currently use the devices. If that sounds concerning, consider this: there is good reason to believe that the numbers are underestimating the problem.

A third of U.S. adult smokers — 12 million people — looked online for quit-smoking information and resources in 2017, more than double the number from 12 years ago. As more smokers turn to the internet for help to quit, they can increase their chances of success with a few tips for making the most of online tools and resources.

Shockney, Lillie D., RN, BS, MAS, ONN-CG. "Obesity Is Tied to Increased Risk for Cancer Among the Young." Academy of Oncology Nurse and Patient Navigators, April 9, 2018.

Evidence from more than 100 research publications has shown that obesity increases the risk for 13 different cancers in young adults. This meta-analysis describes how obesity has shifted specific types of cancers to younger age groups, and intensified cellular mechanisms that promote the disease.

"E-cigs pack a harmful punch." Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, April 4, 2018.

Although e-cigarettes may be a useful tool for people trying to quit regular cigarettes, they also contain harmful chemicals, including formaldehyde and diacetyl, according to Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health’s Joseph Allen.

Zernike, Kate. ""I Can't Stop": Schools Struggle with Vaping Explosion." The New York Times, April 2, 2018.

The student had been caught vaping in school three times before he sat in the vice principal’s office at Cape Elizabeth High School in Maine this winter and shamefacedly admitted what by then was obvious.

“I can’t stop,” he told the vice principal, Nate Carpenter.

Scott Gottlieb, MD. "Reducing the Burden of Chronic Disease." US Food & Drug Administration, March 29, 2018.

More than 630,000 Americans die every year from heart disease.

It’s followed closely by cancer as the second leading cause of death in America, with another 600,000 Americans dying annually from cancer.

While we’ve made progress in reducing deaths due to cancer and heart disease -- in part due to reductions in smoking -- some of that progress is now being offset by the increasing problem of obesity.

Multiple medical organizations have filed suit against the FDA, alleging that delays in the regulation of electronic cigarettes and cigars will unnecessarily expose children and teens to flavored, and other kid-friendly tobacco products, for years to come.

Mayer, Kathryn. "Employee engagement in health benefits keeping employers up at night." Employee Benefit News, March 27, 2018.

Benefit offerings are one of the most important tools for retaining and recruiting employees—but what happens when workers don’t utilize the offerings available? And is the plethora of available resources truly improving a workforce’s health and wellbeing?

For answers, Employee Benefit News spoke to Brian Marcotte, president and CEO at National Business Group on Health, and Mike Thompson, president and CEO of the National Alliance of Healthcare Purchaser Coalitions. The two industry experts sounded off on the challenges benefits managers face when it comes to employee engagement — and the solutions they see going forward.

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