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Gold Standard Articles of Interest for Prevention

2019

McGinley, Laurie. "The Disturbing Links Between Too Much Weight and Several Types of Cancer." The Washington Post, April 14, 2019.
Incollingo, Beth Fand. "Sweet Surrender: Will Cutting Out Sugar Help You Prevent Cancer?." CURE, February 20, 2019.

The latest findings about the dangers of eating sugar and carrying extra body fat may spell bad news when it comes to dietary freedom, but being aware of them gives people the power to lower their cancer risk.

Recent studies confirmed that two diet-related culprits can contribute to the development of cancer: eating sugar, which increases the body’s production of insulin, and having excess body fat, which leads to inflammation. Perhaps surprisingly, these processes happen not only in those who are obese or overweight but also in people who are considered a normal size based on their body mass index (BMI).

 

Powell, Alvin. "A gathering to battle cancer." INDIA New England NEWS, February 5, 2019.

Amid alarming projections that global cancer rates will skyrocket, researchers from around the country gathered at Harvard on Monday to share their latest findings and to launch a center whose aim is to boost early detection and prevention.

By 2040, deaths due to cancer are expected to rise 60 percent in the U.S., 79 percent in China, and 106 percent in sub-Saharan Africa, according to Timothy Rebbeck, Vincent L. Gregory Jr. Professor of Cancer Prevention at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and director of the School’s new Zhu Family Center for Global Cancer Prevention. The center was launched Monday on World Cancer Day.

2018

Berman, Jae. "Want to live a longer life? Research says you should do these five things.." The Washington Post, August 21, 2018.

There seems to always be a mad dash toward the next new thing when it comes to nutrition and fitness — whether it’s the latest exercise craze, superfood or diet regimen. But leaping from fad to fad isn’t exactly a well-reasoned strategy for improving our health. Nor is it a way to create changes that stick — which are the only ones that will have an impact.

If we’re going to generate enough motivation to create sustainable change, we need to have clear objectives and understand how and why our habits fulfill those objectives. That way, when relapses or difficult moments arise — and they always do — our deeper motivation and plan keep us anchored.

If your objective is to live a longer, healthier life, a new study conducted by Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health lays out five practices, none of which needs to involve a fad.

Melnyk, Bernadette. "Buckeye Summit promotes healthy communities." The Ohio State University Alumni News, Summer 2018.

In April, members of the Ohio State community and thought leaders on health and wellness came together for Buckeye Summit, a biennial gathering that seeks to make a positive impact on a pressing issue. This year’s challenge: How can we create healthy communities?

Levine, Hallie. "Want to Try and Prevent Cancer? Then Don't Fall for These 7 Common Myths About the Disease." Johnson & Johnson | Health and Wellness, February 12, 2018.

For National Cancer Prevention Month, we talked to a pair of top experts about common falsehoods about the disease—and what the latest science says about cancer prevention truths.

2016

Singer, Dinah S., Tyler Jacks, Elizabeth Jaffee. "A U.S. “Cancer Moonshot” to accelerate cancer research." Science Magazine, September 9, 2016.

In January 2016 President Obama announced a “Cancer Moonshot” to “accelerate our understanding of cancer and its prevention, early detection, treatment, and cure”. A Blue Ribbon Panel (BRP) of scientific experts was convened to make recommendations to the National Cancer Advisory Board (NCAB), the adviser to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), on research opportunities uniquely poised for acceleration.

Donohue, Thomas J. "Business Community All In on Cancer Moon Shot." US Chamber of Commerce, August 15, 2016.

In 1969, America put a man on the Moon, a breathtaking achievement that many said couldn’t be done. The great challenge of our lifetime is putting an end to cancer. This single disease kills an estimated 600,000 people every year. As with the Moon Shot, the nation must come together again, overcome the odds, and achieve the impossible.

2014

Sherry, Mike. "KC employers urged to help fight cancer." Kansas Health Institute, February 13, 2014.

Fighting the nation’s second leading cause of death is a smart move for companies because it helps keep their workers fit and productive, a top U.S. health official with area connections told a business audience Tuesday at the Kauffman Foundation Conference Center.

2012

Viehbacher, Christopher; Martin Murphy, DMedSc, PhD, FASCO. "Encouraging, lauding steps to reduce cancer risks." The Oklahoman, March 18, 2012.

Public officials find it difficult to lead when personal lifestyle is involved, including choices about smoking, exercise and diet. Yet such prevention initiatives remain important levers for reducing disease. That's why we should be especially proud of Oklahoma's “CEO,” Gov. Mary Fallin, and her decision to prohibit tobacco use on state property. 

2007

Hirschman, Carolyn. "Going for Gold." Employee Benefit News, September 17, 2007.

At $1 an apple, there weren't many takers at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center's cafeterias. The center's wellness team got the price lowered to 75 cents to encourage diners to eat more fresh fruit. Count it as one small step in the battle against cancer.