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Gold Standard Articles of Interest for Quality Treatment & Survivorship

2019

Douglas R. Lowry, MD. "Future Directions in Cancer Survivorship and Aging." Coping with Cancer, July/August 2019.

Declining cancer deaths … More survivors living longer … An exciting time in cancer research and care … 

Although these statements may sound like echoes of what we’ve been saying for several years, they’re not. The landscape of cancer research and care is constantly changing – and for the better. 

Mike Fillon. "Greater support and resources needed for cancer survivors returning to work." Wiley Online Library, April 26, 2019.

A new Canadian study published in Psychooncology (2019;28:792‐798. doi:10.1002/pon.5021) reports that cancer survivors face a range of problems in the workplace, including stigma and misperceptions about their abilities; a higher risk of losing their job compared with healthy controls; a lack of understanding regarding their work abilities, productivity, and reliability; and costs associated with their continued employment.

2017

Moments after the news of Sen. John McCain’s brain tumor reached the internet, he was being pinned with the badge of the cancer warrior. And while arguably no one in the U.S. is more well-positioned to wear the fierce cancer fighter label than McCain, some patients and survivors say it exemplifies how even well-intentioned observers can rely on stock phrases that can sometimes do more harm than good.

2016

Simon, Stacy. "New Website to Help Cancer Survivors Manage Health." American Cancer Society, October 26, 2016.

Springboard Beyond Cancer provides survivors with online tools to manage side effects from cancer treatment, cope with stress, improve healthy behaviors, communicate better with their health care teams, and ask for support from family and friends.

Snapp, Janet; Dori Klemanski. "Survivorship movement helps people learn to live well with cancer." STAT, October 11, 2016.

As cancer treatments improve, that number will grow, and millions more will have to learn to live a life forever altered by cancer. 

2014

Bryla, Jacy. "Cancer Presents Complex Workplace Challenges—According to IBI Research." Integrated Benefits Institute, March 26, 2014.

Cancer typically costs employers about $19,000 annually per 100 employees in lost work time and medical treatments. Lost work time and underperformance at work (presenteeism) due to cancer costs employers $10,000 per 100 workers—more than half of the total costs associated with cancer—and medical and pharmacy treatments cost about $9,100. Employees with cancer are absent 3.8 more days per year than workers without cancer, and also lose the equivalent of 1.8 more days per year to presenteeism.