You are here

Gold Standard Articles of Interest for Screening

2019

One of lung cancer’s most lethal attributes is its ability to trick radiologists. Some nodules appear threatening but turn out to be false positives. Others escape notice entirely, and then spiral without symptoms into metastatic disease.

On Monday, however, Google unveiled an artificial intelligence system that — in early testing — demonstrated a remarkable talent for seeing through lung cancer’s disguises.

Hsiang, Esther Y.; Shivan J. Mehta; Dylan S. Small; Charles A.L. Rareshide; Christopher K. Snider; Susan C. Day; Mitesh S. Patel . "Association of Primary Care Clinic Appointment Time With Clinician Ordering and Patient Completion of Breast and Colorectal Cancer Screening." Jama Network, May 10, 2019.

Cancer is a leading cause of mortality in the United States.  Appropriate cancer screening can be effective in decreasing both morbidity and mortality by detecting and treating cancers at an earlier stage.  However, underuse of cancer screening tests is common.  For example, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that among patients who meet guideline recommendations, approximately 37% of adults have not been screened for colorectal cancer, and 28% of women have not been screened for breast cancer.

Kehren, Heather Carlson. "Mayo Researchers Find "Unacceptable Low" Cervical Cancer Screening Rates." Mayo Clinic, January 7, 2019.

The percentage of women who are screened for cervical cancer may be far lower than national data suggests, according to a Mayo Clinic study recently published in the Journal of Women’s Health (https://www.liebertpub.com/loi/jwh).  Less than two-thirds of women ages 30 to 65 were up-to-date with cervical cancer screenings in 2016. The percentage is even  lower for women ages 21 to 29, with just over half current on screenings. Those figures are well below the 81 percent screening compliance rate self-reported in the 2015 National Health Interview Survey (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis/index.htm).

2018

Santhanam, Laura. "Why aren’t more Americans getting screened for these cancers?." PBS News Hour, July 27, 2017.

Many Americans are not getting screened for cancer, putting them at risk of missing out on earlier intervention or receiving a late-stage diagnosis, according to a recent federal report.

Screening for colorectal cancer should begin at age 45 for people with an average risk, according to an updated clinical guideline from the American Cancer Society (ACS).

The recommendation lowers the age for the initial screening test by 5 years, which ACS officials acknowledged is in response to recent evidence that colorectal cancer (CRC) is occurring more often in younger people. Based on microsimulation modeling that showed a favorable risk:benefit ratio for screening at age 45, the recommendation comes with the "expectation that screening will perform similarly in adults ages 45 to 49 as it does in adults for whom screening is currently recommended."

2017

Levitan, Dave. "Can CT Lung Screening Improve Smoking Cessation Rates?." Cancer Network, August 7, 2017.

Computed tomography (CT) screening for lung cancer can lead to increased rates of smoking cessation in a high-risk population, according to a study of participants in the United Kingdom Lung Cancer Screening (UKLS) pilot trial. This “teachable moment” was particularly strong among those with a positive scan result, though it extended to those with negative results as well.