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Gold Standard Articles of Interest for Organizations

2019

Bassett, Mike. "How to get more men in breast cancer trials?." MedPage Today, October 8, 2019.

The FDA recently drafted new recommendations encouraging the inclusion of more men in breast cancer clinical trials.

The industry draft guidance urges that eligibility for breast cancer drugs should include both men and women, and that there should be a scientific rationale included in a trial protocol when men are excluded from trials.

"Outbreak of Lung Injury Associated with E-Cigarette Use, or Vaping." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, September 19, 2019.
  • There are 530* cases of lung injury reported from 38 states and 1 U.S. territory. Seven deaths have been confirmed in 6 states.
  • CDC has received complete sex and age data on 373 of 530 cases.
    • Nearly three fourths (72%) of cases are male
    • Two thirds (67%) of cases are 18 to 34 years old
    • 16% of cases are under 18 years and 17% are 35 years or older
  • All reported cases have a history of e-cigarette product use or vaping.
  • Based on initial data from certain states we know: Most patients have reported a history of using e-cigarette products containing THC. Many patients have reported using THC and nicotine. Some have reported the use of e-cigarette products containing only nicotine.
Saul, Jessie. "Your Boss Doesn’t Support a Smoke-Free Policy…Now What?." ex Program, September 17, 2019.

Not every business leader embraces a smoke-free policy or tobacco-free workplace. Surprised? Don’t be.

Today 20% of indoor workers in the U.S. are not yet covered by a 100% smoke-free policy. And if you work in certain industries, such as construction, agriculture, and transportation, your company is even less likely to have a workplace no-smoking policy.

Today, the Trump Administration announced that as part of its ongoing work to tackle the epidemic of youth e-cigarette use, the FDA intends to finalize a compliance policy in the coming weeks that would prioritize the agency’s enforcement of the premarket authorization requirements for non-tobacco-flavored e-cigarettes, including mint and menthol, clearing the market of unauthorized, non-tobacco-flavored e-cigarette products. The FDA plans to share more on the specific details of the plan and its implementation soon.

Within days, Alexander Mitchell had gone from being a 20-year-old hiking enthusiast to being kept alive by two machines forcing air into and out of his lungs and oxygenating his blood outside of his body.

Sun, Lena; Lindsey Bever. "Mystery lung illness linked to vaping. Health officials investigating nearly 100 possible cases.." The Washington Post, August 16, 2019.

State and federal health officials are investigating almost 100 cases of mysterious lung illnesses linked to vaping and e-cigarette use in 14 states, many of them involving teens and young adults. A large number of those stricken ill have been hospitalized, with some in intensive care and on ventilators.

Chris Sweeney. "The problem with industry-sponsored vaping research." Harvard T.H. Chan, August 16, 2019.

Use of e-cigarettes and other vaping products including Juul is soaring, especially among youths. Between 2017 and 2018, the prevalence of current e-cigarette use among U.S. high school students increased from 12% to 21%. Andy Tan, assistant professor of social and behavioral sciences, recently co-authored a Lancetarticle examining how Juul is funding scientific research—and why this is problematic.

Sheila Kaplan. "The F.D.A.’s New Cigarette Warnings Are Disturbing. See for Yourself.." The New York Times, 8/15/19.

WASHINGTON — The corpse is gone.

So are the grief-stricken woman, the rotting teeth and the man struggling to smoke despite a hole in his windpipe.

Nine years after the Food and Drug Administration first proposed graphic images as warnings on cigarette packs but was thwarted by tobacco companies in a successful court battle, the agency announced on Thursday that it is finally issuing a new set.

 

Jeff Minerd. "Obesity-Associated Cancers on the Rise in Younger Patients." MedPage Today, 8/15/19.

Obesity-associated cancers are affecting people at earlier ages in the U.S., a population-based study found.

The analysis of more than 2.6 million incident cases from 2000 to 2016 found that the percentage of new cases of obesity-associated cancer occurring in individuals 65 and older decreased over this interval, whereas it increased in those ages 50-64, said Siran Koroukian, PhD, of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, and colleagues.

Roan, Shari. "Public Health Officials Push for More Effort Vaccinating Kids Against HPV." Everyday Health, July 17, 2019.

Public health officials called for vast improvements in childhood vaccination against the human papillomavirus (HPV) during a congressional briefing June 27, 2019, in Washington, DC. HPV infections, experts testified, are causing significant increases in some types of cancers at a time when many other types of cancers are declining, per a report published May 30, 2019, in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Ali, PhD, Fatma Romeh M.; Maeh Al-Shawaf, MPH; Teresa W. Wang, PhD; Brian A. King, PhD, MPH. "US Adults' Attitudes Toward Lowering Nicotine Levels in Cigarettes." American Journal of Preventive Medicine, July 11, 2019.

Although cigarette smoking has declined considerably in recent decades, it remains the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the U.S., causing an estimated 480,000 deaths annually.  Two thirds of smokers want to quit smoking, yet fewer than 1 in 10 are able to quit each year.  This is primarily because cigarettes contain nicotine, which is a highly addictive drug.

 

Adams, Vice Adm. Jerome; Lt. Gen. Nadja West; Vice Adm. Forrest Faison; Lt. Gen Dorothy Hogg. "Tobacco product use threatens military readiness." Stars and Stripes, July 7, 2019.

To our servicemembers:

The surgeons general of the Air Force, Army, Navy, and United States are united in our concerns about high levels of tobacco product use among uniformed servicemembers.  Tobacco product use is a threat to the health and fitness of our forces and compromises readiness, the foundation of a strong national defense.

Harrison, Pam. "Cancer Deaths Cost U.S. Billions in Lost Earnings Each Year." MedPage Today, July 3, 2019.

Premature death from cancer each year costs the American economy a staggering amount in lost earnings, new research found.

In 2015, 8.7 million years of life were lost due to early cancer death, amounting to $94.4 billion in lost earnings, reported Farhad Islami, MD, PhD, and colleagues from the American Cancer Society in Atlanta.

Douglas R. Lowry, MD. "Future Directions in Cancer Survivorship and Aging." Coping with Cancer, July/August 2019.

Declining cancer deaths … More survivors living longer … An exciting time in cancer research and care … 

Although these statements may sound like echoes of what we’ve been saying for several years, they’re not. The landscape of cancer research and care is constantly changing – and for the better. 

Loftus, Eileen Glanton. "Let's End HPV-related Cancers: A Congressional Briefing." American Association for Cancer Research, June 28, 2019.

Every two minutes, a woman somewhere in the world dies of cervical cancer.

That harrowing statistic, shared by Anna R. Giuliano, PhD, founding director of the Center for Immunization and Infection Research in Cancer at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida, reflects a great frustration in public health. There is a vaccine that prevents infection with the virus that can cause cervical cancer and several other cancer types, yet worldwide, not enough people are taking advantage of it.

Boyles, Salynn. "Big Study to Explore Long-Term Impact of Vaping, Pollution." MedPage Today, June 21, 2019.

The long-term impact of vaping on the lungs and the impact of early-life air pollution exposures will be among the key focuses of a first-of-its kind federally funded, longitudinal study of lung health among millennials.

Researchers from Northwestern Medicine in Chicago, in partnership with the American Lung Association, plan to follow 4,000 healthy adults from the ages of 25 to 35 in an effort to gain further insights into the causes of chronic respiratory diseases common in later life.

When the 17-year-old boy arrived at Primary Children’s Hospital in Salt Lake City, his entire jaw was cracked and a chunk of the bone had been completely shattered. Several of his teeth were missing and there was a hole in his chin.

Glimcher, Laurie H.. "Ending the Long Reach of Tobacco." The Boston Globe, June 13, 2019.

Many of us know someone whose life was cut short by tobacco, and their stories are heartbreaking. What makes them even more so is that, in many cases, it didn’t have to happen. As the leading cause of preventable death, smoking causes 1 in 5 of all deaths in the United States, totaling more than 480,000 annually. Tobacco is also linked to about one-third of all cancers in the United States, including cancers of the pancreas, bladder, kidney, mouth, and throat, as well as the lung. Even with all of the recent advancements in cancer research and care, these remain some of the most lethal and difficult cancers to treat.

Bankhead, Charles. "More Evidence Links Body Fat with Prostate Cancer." MedPage Today, June 12, 2019.

Increasing body fat accumulation significantly raised men's odds of developing advanced and fatal prostate cancer, data from a large prospective study of men in Iceland showed.

Higher concentrations of visceral and thigh fat increased the odds of aggressive or fatal prostate cancer by 30%-40% as compared with leaner men. The prostate cancer risk associated with increased visceral fat accumulation carried over to men who had a lower BMI, reported Barbra A. Dickerman, PhD, of the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, and colleagues.

Nackerdien, Zeena. "E-Cig Flavors May Damage Cardiovascular Cells." MedPage Today, June 6, 2019.

One of the risk factors for cardiovascular (CV) diseases is smoking-induced endothelial dysfunction. Joseph C. Wu, MD, PhD, of the Stanford School of Medicine in California, and colleagues used iPSC-ECs to assess the health impact of e-cigarettes. By definition, these cells can become many different cell types, and therefore provided investigators with a means to study cells that would be hard to isolate from any given patient.

CHICAGO–In patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), both current and former smoking is associated with worse treatment outcomes in treatment-naïve patients. A history of smoking is associated with molecular and cytogenetic risk factors, suggesting that it is tied to biological characteristics of the tumor rather than smoking-related comorbidities.

Collins, Frances. "Ultra-Processed Diet Leads to Extra Calories, Weight Gain." NIH Director's Blog, May 21, 2019.

If you’ve ever tried to lose a few pounds or just stay at a healthy weight, you’ve likely encountered a dizzying array of diets, each with passionate proponents: low carb, low fat, keto, paleo, vegan, Mediterranean, and so on. Yet most nutrition experts agree on one thing: it’s best to steer clear of ultra-processed foods. Now, there’s some solid scientific evidence to back up that advice.

One of lung cancer’s most lethal attributes is its ability to trick radiologists. Some nodules appear threatening but turn out to be false positives. Others escape notice entirely, and then spiral without symptoms into metastatic disease.

On Monday, however, Google unveiled an artificial intelligence system that — in early testing — demonstrated a remarkable talent for seeing through lung cancer’s disguises.

Hsiang, Esther Y.; Shivan J. Mehta; Dylan S. Small; Charles A.L. Rareshide; Christopher K. Snider; Susan C. Day; Mitesh S. Patel . "Association of Primary Care Clinic Appointment Time With Clinician Ordering and Patient Completion of Breast and Colorectal Cancer Screening." Jama Network, May 10, 2019.

Cancer is a leading cause of mortality in the United States.  Appropriate cancer screening can be effective in decreasing both morbidity and mortality by detecting and treating cancers at an earlier stage.  However, underuse of cancer screening tests is common.  For example, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that among patients who meet guideline recommendations, approximately 37% of adults have not been screened for colorectal cancer, and 28% of women have not been screened for breast cancer.

Mike Fillon. "Greater support and resources needed for cancer survivors returning to work." Wiley Online Library, April 26, 2019.

A new Canadian study published in Psychooncology (2019;28:792‐798. doi:10.1002/pon.5021) reports that cancer survivors face a range of problems in the workplace, including stigma and misperceptions about their abilities; a higher risk of losing their job compared with healthy controls; a lack of understanding regarding their work abilities, productivity, and reliability; and costs associated with their continued employment.

Zraick, Karen; Emily S. Rueb. "Walgreens Is Latest to Raise Vaping (and Smoking) Age to 21." The New York Times, April 23, 2019.

The drugstore chain Walgreens will stop selling tobacco products to customers under 21, the company announced on Tuesday.

Jacobs, Megan. "Yes, You Still Have Smokers in Your Workplace." The EX Program, April 10, 2019.

Now that smoking is no longer the employee health issue it once was, companies can turn their attention to other wellness program strategies, right?

Unfortunately not.

Because smoking in the workplace today isn’t always obvious, that’s led some employers to believe this type of addiction isn’t a big issue anymore. Out of sight, out of mind, out of HR planning.

That misperception can be very costly on multiple levels—from direct productivity losses to higher healthcare expenditures. Even worse, it means those who do smoke won’t get the help they need.

Kaplan, Sheila. "Senator McConnell, a Tobacco Ally, Supports Raising Age to Buy Cigarettes." The New York Times, April 18, 2019.

WASHINGTON — Senator Mitch McConnell, long one of the tobacco industry’s loyal allies, said on Thursday that he would sponsor legislation to raise the minimum age to 21 for the purchase of tobacco and e-cigarettes.

McGinley, Laurie. "The Disturbing Links Between Too Much Weight and Several Types of Cancer." The Washington Post, April 14, 2019.

It’s not that often that you hear a top Trump official unabashedly blaming a US company for a health crisis. But that’s exactly what FDA chief Scott Gottlieb did Tuesday in an interview during his final week in office.

Clinicians and public health practitioners should start considering the concept of flourishing when examining patients and assessing population-level health trends, according to a new Viewpoint article in JAMA, authored by Tyler VanderWeele, Ph.D. (Human Flourishing Program — Harvard), Eileen McNeely, Ph.D. (SHINE— Harvard), and Howard K. Koh, M.D., M.P.H. (Culture of Health — Harvard). It explores how even more holistic measures of “well-being” from medicine, psychology, economics, sociology, and government, while coming closer to capturing an individual’s complete wellbeing, still often fall short.

Boyles, Salynn. "Survey of Adults' Perceptions of E-Cig Safety Yields Surprise." Med Page Today, March 29, 2019.

Adults in the U.S. increasingly think electronic cigarettes are as harmful as combustible cigarettes, if not more so, according to findings from two multiyear national surveys.

Munarriz, Rick. "Disney Bans Smoking at Disney World and Disneyland." The Motley Fool, March 28, 2019.

It's going to be harder to get your smoke on at one of Walt Disney's (NYSE:DIS) domestic theme parks in a few weeks. Smoking will no longer be permitted inside Disney World and Disneyland theme parks and water parks starting May 1. The ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex in Florida and Downtown Disney in California will also be participating in the ban. 

 

"Higher consumption of sugary beverages linked with increased risk of mortality." Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, March 18, 2019.

The more sugar-sweetened beverages(SSBs) people consumed, the greater their risk of premature death—particularly death from cardiovascular disease, and to a lesser extent from cancer, according to a large long-term study of U.S. men and women. The risk of early death linked with drinking SSBs was more pronounced among women.

Maloney, Jennifer. "FDA Sets Limits on Retail Sales of Flavored E-Cigarettes." Wall Street Journal, March 13, 2019.

Convenience stores and gas stations will effectively be banned from selling most flavored e-cigarettes under restrictions issued Wednesday by the Food and Drug Administration.

"Making Cancer Clinical Trials Available to More Patients." NCI Cancer Currents Blog, March 7, 2019.

With so many new and promising cancer treatments being developed, the need for clinical trials to efficiently and effectively test them has never been greater.

Maximizing the number of patients who are eligible for clinical trials, while still maintaining an appropriate level of safety, is a top priority for NCI leadership, given the challenges of enrolling enough patients in clinical trials. Eligibility criteria—the requirements that must be met before a person can enroll in a trial—have not kept pace with the modernization of clinical trials. Restrictive criteria have not only been a significant hurdle for many patients who have wanted to participate in trials, but they have also limited the generalizability of study findings.

Incollingo, Beth Fand. "Sweet Surrender: Will Cutting Out Sugar Help You Prevent Cancer?." CURE, February 20, 2019.

The latest findings about the dangers of eating sugar and carrying extra body fat may spell bad news when it comes to dietary freedom, but being aware of them gives people the power to lower their cancer risk.

Recent studies confirmed that two diet-related culprits can contribute to the development of cancer: eating sugar, which increases the body’s production of insulin, and having excess body fat, which leads to inflammation. Perhaps surprisingly, these processes happen not only in those who are obese or overweight but also in people who are considered a normal size based on their body mass index (BMI).

 

Interviewer: Laurie Scudder, DNP, NP. "Vaping and e-Cigarettes in Kids: An Unprecedented Epidemic." Medscape, January 31, 2019.

An Interview With US Surgeon General Jerome Adams and FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb

"Quitting e-cigarettes." truth initiative, January 19, 2019.

In the wake of the surgeon general declaring a youth e-cigarette epidemic, Truth Initiative® has expanded its quit-smoking resources to include a first-of-its kind e-cigarette quit program. This innovative and free text message program was created with input from teens, college students and young adults who have attempted to, or successfully, quit e-cigarettes.

The program is tailored by age group to give teens and young adults appropriate recommendations about quitting. The program will also serve as a resource for parents looking to help their children who now vape.

Fox, Maggie. "FDA chief threatens to take e-cigarettes off the market." NBC News, January 19, 2018.

Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb made his most direct threat yet against e-cigarette companies Friday, saying they face an “existential threat” if they don’t stop marketing to youth.

Fillon, Mike. "Tobacco Control Initiatives Cut the Number of Lung Cancer Deaths in California by 28%." CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians: Volume 69, Issue 2, January 15, 2019.

Convincing young people not to start smoking is one of the most effective ways to curb tobacco‐related illness and mortality.  Physicians and other health care practitioners play a vital role in helping patients who smoke pursue evidence‐based cessation options. Clinicians can—and should be encouraged to—engage in the policy advocacy process.

Simon, Stacy. "Facts & Figures 2019: US Cancer Death Rate has Dropped 27% in 25 Years." American Cancer Society, January 8, 2019.

The death rate from cancer in the US has declined steadily over the past 25 years, according to annual statistics reporting from the American Cancer Society. As of 2016, the cancer death rate for men and women combined had fallen 27% from its peak in 1991. This decline translates to about 1.5% per year and more than 2.6 million deaths avoided between 1991 and 2016.

Kehren, Heather Carlson. "Mayo Researchers Find "Unacceptable Low" Cervical Cancer Screening Rates." Mayo Clinic, January 7, 2019.

The percentage of women who are screened for cervical cancer may be far lower than national data suggests, according to a Mayo Clinic study recently published in the Journal of Women’s Health (https://www.liebertpub.com/loi/jwh).  Less than two-thirds of women ages 30 to 65 were up-to-date with cervical cancer screenings in 2016. The percentage is even  lower for women ages 21 to 29, with just over half current on screenings. Those figures are well below the 81 percent screening compliance rate self-reported in the 2015 National Health Interview Survey (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis/index.htm).

2018

Carroll, Aaron E.. "Are You Sitting Down? Standing Desks Are Overrated." New York Times, November 19, 2018.

We know that physical activity is good for us, and that being sedentary is not. Some have extrapolated this to mean that sitting, in general, is something to be avoided, even at work. Perhaps as a result, standing desks have become trendy and are promoted by some health officials as well as some countries.

Research, however, suggests that warnings about sitting at work are overblown, and that standing desks are overrated as a way to improve health.

Lyles, Ashley. "National Exercise Guidelines Now Say 'Just Move' ." MedPage Today, November 12, 2018.

Any physical activity will help, more is better, and it helps for a wider range of health outcomes than previously noted, according to new U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) guidelines.

Reedy, Jill, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D.. "Studying “Total Diet” and Its Impact on Health, Including Cancer Risk." National Cancer Institute, October 25, 2018.

Does what we eat and drink affect our risk of developing cancer?

We've all heard exercise helps you live longer. But a new study goes one step further, finding that a sedentary lifestyle is worse for your health than smoking, diabetes and heart disease.

Agency seeks more information from companies as it continues to pursue its Youth Tobacco Prevention Plan amid evidence of sharply rising e-cigarette use among kids

"FDA approves expanded use of Gardasil 9 to include individuals 27 through 45 years old." US Food and Drug Administration Press Release, October 5, 2018.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a supplemental application for Gardasil 9 (Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 9-valent Vaccine, Recombinant) expanding the approved use of the vaccine to include women and men aged 27 through 45 years. Gardasil 9 prevents certain cancers and diseases caused by the nine HPV types covered by the vaccine.

Anna Edney and Olivia Zaleski. "Juul in FDA's Sights as U.S. Rethinks Position on E-Cigarettes." Bloomberg, October 2, 2018.

U.S. public health officials are changing their stance on the upstart e-cigarette industry.

Berman, Jae. "Want to live a longer life? Research says you should do these five things.." The Washington Post, August 21, 2018.

There seems to always be a mad dash toward the next new thing when it comes to nutrition and fitness — whether it’s the latest exercise craze, superfood or diet regimen. But leaping from fad to fad isn’t exactly a well-reasoned strategy for improving our health. Nor is it a way to create changes that stick — which are the only ones that will have an impact.

If we’re going to generate enough motivation to create sustainable change, we need to have clear objectives and understand how and why our habits fulfill those objectives. That way, when relapses or difficult moments arise — and they always do — our deeper motivation and plan keep us anchored.

If your objective is to live a longer, healthier life, a new study conducted by Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health lays out five practices, none of which needs to involve a fad.

The Food and Drug Administration is ramping up its teen tobacco-awareness campaign to include the dangers of vaping.

The agency has used its Real Cost campaign to dissuade teens from smoking cigarettes and chewing tobacco, but the latest iteration is focused on the dangers of vaping. It is educating teens that many of the same dangers of cigarettes, like nicotine addiction, lung damage, and cancer, are present in e-cigarettes or other vapes. 

FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD, declared teen use of electronic cigarettes an "epidemic" and said the agency would be addressing the issue with "the largest coordinated tobacco compliance effort in FDA's history."

Actions being considered -- but not yet undertaken -- include the immediate removal of certain flavored e-cigarettes from the market and shortening the time to market review for most cigarettes now being sold.

"How Firms Can Convince Employees to Quit Smoking." The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, August 28, 2018.

Wellness programs are increasing in popularity as companies grow more determined to curb the soaring costs of providing health insurance for employees. To encourage healthy behaviors, firms are offering everything from free yoga classes to weight-loss support groups. While there have been some positive results from these programs, smoking cessation remains a particular challenge. But a recent study by two University of Pennsylvania experts found that cash can be a powerful incentive to help smokers quit. 

Selig, Roni; Maddie Bender and Davide Cannaviccio. "Juul and the vape debate: Choosing between smokers and teens." CNN Health, August 9, 2018.

The teen vaping epidemic has made its mark in high schools.

To mark World Lung Cancer Day on August 1st, Cancer Network spoke with Dr. Alan Blum, Professor and Gerald Leon Wallace, MD, Endowed Chair of Family Medicine at the University of Alabama School of Medicine, where he also directs the University’s Center for the Study of Tobacco and Society, which he founded in 1999. Dr. Blum is an expert on the history of tobacco use, tobacco industry marketing, and the anti-smoking movement. He is a renowned pioneer in creative physician-led public advocacy initiatives to counter the promotion of unhealthy products and lethal lifestyles. 

—Interviewed by Anna Azvolinsky

Santhanam, Laura. "Why aren’t more Americans getting screened for these cancers?." PBS News Hour, July 27, 2017.

Many Americans are not getting screened for cancer, putting them at risk of missing out on earlier intervention or receiving a late-stage diagnosis, according to a recent federal report.

Melnyk, Bernadette. "Buckeye Summit promotes healthy communities." The Ohio State University Alumni News, Summer 2018.

In April, members of the Ohio State community and thought leaders on health and wellness came together for Buckeye Summit, a biennial gathering that seeks to make a positive impact on a pressing issue. This year’s challenge: How can we create healthy communities?

McKay, Betsy. "Vaping Doesn’t Often Help Smokers Quit, New Study Finds." The Wall Street Journal, July 9, 2018.

Adult smokers who didn’t use electronic vaping devices were more than twice as likely to quit, according to the study.

Australia made it mandatory in 2011 for cigarettes to be sold in drab-looking packets that carry health warnings.

Seven years on, the WTO has rejected complaints from four nations that the laws violate international trade.

Unless there is a successful appeal, the decision is expected to hasten similar regulations around the world.

Junqian , Xu. "CEOs Pledge to Stub Out Smoking." China Daily, June 21, 2018.

Senior executives of companies in Shanghai’s Lujiazui district, known as the “Wall Street of China”, pledged to create a smoke-free working environment last Wednesday. Initiated by NGO the CEO Roundtable on Cancer-China and supported by the World Health Organization, the national campaign aims to encourage as many enterprises as possible in the country to say no to smoking not only inside their offices, but also in factories, on campuses and other open spaces.

Remarks by Scott Gottlieb, M.D., at the Tobacco Regulatory Science Program Meeting. "FDA’s Nicotine and Tobacco Regulation and the Key Role of Regulatory Science." Food and Drug Administration, June 18, 2018.

I speak to you during a moment of extraordinary promise for tobacco regulation. The FDA is engaged in a profound dialogue about the best ways to improve public health through the agency’s tobacco regulatory approaches under the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act.

"Parents See Cancer Prevention Potential as Best Reason for HPV Vaccination." American Association for Cancer Research, June 14, 2018.

Parents of adolescents believed that the potential to prevent certain types of cancer is the best reason for their children to receive the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, whereas other reasons health care providers often give were far less persuasive, according to results published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Joint statement encourages parents, young adults and physicians to take advantage of vaccination to prevent future HPV-related cancers

Michael D. Becker as told to Jo Cavallo. "HPV-Related Cancers Like Mine Are Avoidable, So Why Aren’t More Kids Being Vaccinated?." ASCO Post, May 10, 2018.

The latest news from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention about vaccination rates in the United States for human papillomavirus (HPV) is disappointing. It shows that in 2016, just 43.4% of adolescents (49.5% of females and 37.5% of males) were up-to-date with the recommended 3-dose HPV vaccination series,1 which is far below the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Healthy People 2020 goal of 80% coverage.2 Each year, HPV causes about 41,000 cases of cancer in the United States,3 and I’m sorry to say I am among its victims.

"Sedentary Lifestyle Drastically Increases Risk of Dying from Cancer." Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, April 18, 2018.

Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have once again identified a link between physical inactivity and an increased risk of mortality among cancer patients, emphasizing the health risks of a sedentary lifestyle and the importance of regular exercise as therapy for cancer patients both during and after treatment. The team is presenting the findings of their research today at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2018 in Chicago, Ill.

A third of U.S. adult smokers — 12 million people — looked online for quit-smoking information and resources in 2017, more than double the number from 12 years ago. As more smokers turn to the internet for help to quit, they can increase their chances of success with a few tips for making the most of online tools and resources.

Shockney, Lillie D., RN, BS, MAS, ONN-CG. "Obesity Is Tied to Increased Risk for Cancer Among the Young." Academy of Oncology Nurse and Patient Navigators, April 9, 2018.

Evidence from more than 100 research publications has shown that obesity increases the risk for 13 different cancers in young adults. This meta-analysis describes how obesity has shifted specific types of cancers to younger age groups, and intensified cellular mechanisms that promote the disease.

"E-cigs pack a harmful punch." Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, April 4, 2018.

Although e-cigarettes may be a useful tool for people trying to quit regular cigarettes, they also contain harmful chemicals, including formaldehyde and diacetyl, according to Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health’s Joseph Allen.

Zernike, Kate. ""I Can't Stop": Schools Struggle with Vaping Explosion." The New York Times, April 2, 2018.

The student had been caught vaping in school three times before he sat in the vice principal’s office at Cape Elizabeth High School in Maine this winter and shamefacedly admitted what by then was obvious.

“I can’t stop,” he told the vice principal, Nate Carpenter.

Scott Gottlieb, MD. "Reducing the Burden of Chronic Disease." US Food & Drug Administration, March 29, 2018.

More than 630,000 Americans die every year from heart disease.

It’s followed closely by cancer as the second leading cause of death in America, with another 600,000 Americans dying annually from cancer.

While we’ve made progress in reducing deaths due to cancer and heart disease -- in part due to reductions in smoking -- some of that progress is now being offset by the increasing problem of obesity.

Multiple medical organizations have filed suit against the FDA, alleging that delays in the regulation of electronic cigarettes and cigars will unnecessarily expose children and teens to flavored, and other kid-friendly tobacco products, for years to come.

kahn, Tamar. "Michael Bloomberg and STOP have Big Tobacco in their sights." Business Day, March 7, 2018.

Former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg is putting $20m into countering the tobacco industry’s attempts to undermine tobacco control measures, with the creation of a new global watchdog called Stopping Tobacco Organisations and Products (STOP) that will be run by his foundation, Bloomberg Philanthropies.

Lyman, Stewart. "The HPV Vaccine: Preventing Cancer Beats Treating It." Lyman BioPharma Consulting, LLC, March 5, 2018.

You don’t have to be an oncologist to know that fighting cancer is tough. Nearly 1.7 million Americans will be diagnosed with cancer this year, and about 600,000 will die from the disease. But here’s some good news: overall U.S. cancer deaths have been in a steep decline for over 25 years. Much of this reduction is tied to a decline in smoking, along with early detection of some cancers (e.g. colon), and more effective cancer therapies. While treatments against some particular types of cancer have advanced greatly, it’s still a disease no one wants to face. Fighting an opponent that you can never be really sure you’ve defeated challenges both the physical strength and mental fortitude of those who’ve been diagnosed. I know because I’ve been there.

 

Levine, Hallie. "Want to Try and Prevent Cancer? Then Don't Fall for These 7 Common Myths About the Disease." Johnson & Johnson | Health and Wellness, February 12, 2018.

For National Cancer Prevention Month, we talked to a pair of top experts about common falsehoods about the disease—and what the latest science says about cancer prevention truths.

"Can Exercise Reduce the Risk of Cancer Recurrence?." Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, February 7, 2018.

Exercising, even at a moderate level, is one thing cancer survivors can do to lower the odds of cancer recurrence. The most consistent and largest number of studies looking at the links between exercise and cancer recurrence and overall survival have been reported for patients with breast and colorectal cancer, though increasingly other cancer types are also being studied.

Associated Press. "Anti-smoking plan may kill cigarettes — and save Big Tobacco." STAT, January 19, 2018.

Imagine if cigarettes were no longer addictive and smoking itself became almost obsolete; only a tiny segment of Americans still lit up. That’s the goal of an unprecedented anti-smoking plan being carefully fashioned by U.S. health officials.

Bernardo, Richie. "The Real Cost of Smoking by State." WalletHub, January 17, 2018.

Smoking doesn’t just ruin your health. It can also burn a nasty hole through your wallet. WalletHub looked into the true per-person cost of smoking in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Rosenthal, Eric T. "Cancer.com Site Sat Dormant for 10 Years. Now It's Live Again." MedPage Today, January 15, 2018.

- Janssen Biotech gives it new life, but will it provide useful info? After lying moribund for the past 10 years, the website cancer.com is now online and full of content.

Myers, Mathew L., and Robin Koval. "Commentary: Philip Morris Says It Wants to Quit Cigarettes. But It’s Just Blowing Smoke.." Fortune, January 5, 2018.

Philip Morris International (PMI)—the giant cigarette manufacturer operating in most countries excluding the U.S.—claims it wants a smoke-free future, placing advertisements in major United Kingdom newspapers earlier this week with a New Year’s resolution: “We’re trying to give up cigarettes.”

2017

Kanski, Alison. "FDA campaign reframes quitting for smokers." PR Week, December 19, 2017.

Every Try Counts, which will launch in January, is the FDA’s first smoking cessation campaign targeting adults. The FDA wants to reframe quitting smoking for this audience as a process that often takes more than one attempt.

Croyle, Robert, PhD: Michele Bloch, MD, PhD. "An Important Moment in Tobacco Control." National Cancer Institute, November 28, 2017.

This past Sunday, November 26, 2017, marked a unique moment in the history of public health in the United States. On this day, in major newspapers (online and print), the three major US tobacco companies issued the first in what will be a series of five "corrective statements" about their products.

Healthier beverage choices are becoming more popular among the U.S. population, a new study found.

Bridges, Nicola. "Wellness at Work: The New Healthy Epidemic ." November 3, 2017.

Forget sleeping on the job getting you fired. Forward-thinking companies today encourage rest and relaxation at work, providing employees with everything from high-tech power-nap pods to silent meditation and mindfulness rooms.

"tobacco nation: the deadly state of smoking disparity in the u.s.." The Truth Initiative, October 4, 2017.

Smoking in the U.S. has dramatically declined in the last two decades, particularly among the country’s youngest residents. In 2000, 23 percent of teens smoked cigarettes. By 2016, the number had fallen to just 6 percent. While there is much to celebrate in the reduction, the average national rate hides a significant variation found within the country. A collection of 12 contiguous states stretching from the upper Midwest to the South undermines this national achievement. In the region of the country we’ve termed “Tobacco Nation,” smoking prevalence exceeds not only the national average, but that of many of the most tobacco-dependent countries in the world.

"Are e-cigarettes ‘safer’ than regular cigarettes?." UNC Health Care and UNC School of Medicine Newsroom, October 20, 2017.

UNC School of Medicine researchers lead new study showing that e-cigarettes trigger unique and potentially damaging immune responses in human airways.

"2017 AACR Cancer Progress Report." American Association for Cancer Research, September 13, 2017.

With the number of cancer cases diagnosed in the United States rising every year, it is vital that the AACR increases public awareness about cancer and the importance of research for improving health and saving lives from cancer. The annual AACR Cancer Progress Report is a cornerstone of these educational efforts and the AACR’s work to advocate for increased funding for the federal agencies that are vital for fueling progress against cancer— in particular, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Two scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) will receive the 2017 Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award for their significant research leading to the development of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines. 

Hancock, Katherine. "Texas A&M Becomes a Living Laboratory for Workplace Health." Vital Record - News from Texas A&M Health Science Center, September 6, 2017.

The Ergonomics Center at the Texas A&M School of Public Health is studying if there’s a way to disrupt one of the 21st century’s health epidemics—sedentary work environments—and using volunteers at their own university as test subjects. Researchers have recruited employees of the Division of Student Affairs at Texas A&M University to see if standing desks and software prompts can improve not just their health, but their productivity, too.

Pirschel, Chris and Sheila Prindiville, MD. "How Do You Find Clinical Trials Through the NCI’s Advanced Clinical Trials Search?." ONS Voice, September 5, 2017.

As part of the National Cancer Moonshot Initiative and in collaboration with the Presidential Innovation Fellows, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed and launched a new website in 2016. It provides user-friendly access to the repository of abstracts of cancer clinical trials that NCI supported.

Wan, William. "New ads accuse Big Tobacco of targeting soldiers and people with mental illness." Washington Post, August 24, 2017.

Truth Initiative, a leading tobacco-control nonprofit, has bought TV ads to run this Sunday during MTV’s Music Awards that accuse tobacco companies of purposely targeting mentally ill people and U.S. soldiers.

A federal court on Tuesday threw out a rule allowing employers to call their workplace wellness programs “voluntary” when employees stand to lose thousands of dollars for not participating — a win for groups that challenged what they argue are coercive programs that have not been shown to improve employees’ health.

Zalesky, Andrew. "The hidden power of nonprofits in the struggle against cancer." MedCity News, August 2, 2017.

Not for profits are very willing to collaborate,” said Jill O’Donnell-Tormey, CEO and director of scientific affairs of the New York-based Cancer Research Institute, during a discussion at the MedCity CONVERGE Conference in Philadelphia this week.

Agency to pursue lowering nicotine in cigarettes to non-addictive levels and create more predictability in tobacco regulation

UI Health Care employees hit the road for bike ride across Iowa.

Many UI Health Care employees participate in the Register’s Annual Great Bicycle Ride Across Iowa (RAGBRAI) each summer, and this year’s ride is no exception.This week, The Loop is highlighting several UI Health Care staff members cyclingfrom Orange City to Lansing.

Moments after the news of Sen. John McCain’s brain tumor reached the internet, he was being pinned with the badge of the cancer warrior. And while arguably no one in the U.S. is more well-positioned to wear the fierce cancer fighter label than McCain, some patients and survivors say it exemplifies how even well-intentioned observers can rely on stock phrases that can sometimes do more harm than good.

Shockney, Lillie D., RN, BS, MAS, ONN-CG. "Part II: What Employers, Navigators Need to Know About Cancer’s Impact in the Workplace." Academy of Oncology Nurse and Patient Navigators, May 17, 2017.

In Part I, you learned about the incidence of cancer, its financial impact on employers, and that this impact will continue to grow in the coming decade(s). In Part II, you will get insights into what we have learned at Johns Hopkins, as well as in other workplace environments that is important for navigators to understand.

Shockney, Lillie D., RN, BS, MAS, ONN-CG. "What Employers, Navigators Need to Know about Cancer’s Impact in the Workplace." Academy of Oncology Nurse and Patient Navigators, April 20, 2017.

This expert commentary, which is divided into specific parts for you to read, emphasizes the impact that the workforce is facing when it comes to cancer today, and in the future. You will find more and more employers wanting to better understand the incidence of cancer among their employees because they are absorbing most of the cost of that cancer care—from a treatment perspective as well as a paid time off perspective.

Public Law Center. "Tobacco use as a Health Equity Issue." Public Law Center, Legal Update, Spring Issue.

Despite a decline in tobacco use among U.S. adults over the past several decades, tobacco-related health disparities in both cigarette smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke have increased. This Legal Update highlights the disproportionate impact of tobacco use on vulnerable populations, including individuals suffering from behavioral health and substance use disorders, low socioeconomic populations, and other groups.

Terry, Michael, John Seffrin, Ph.D., K. Michael Cummings, Ph.D., Allan Erickson, and Donald Shopland. "Ending Cigarette Use by Adults in a Generation is Possible." March 2017.

Chronic exposure to tobacco smoke is the single largest cause of preventable illness and premature death in the United States today. In spite of significant progress in tobacco control over the last half century, tobacco use is still the cause of nearly one in every four deaths daily in America.

Kelly, Amanda. "Walk This Way! How 5-Minute Strolls at Work Can Boost Your Mood and Cut Cravings." Johnson & Johnson, January 4, 2017.

The research has become impossible to ignore: All this sitting we’re doing is doing us in. And while we know staying glued to our office chairs is bad for our health (and our mindset), what’s the alternative?

A recent study supported by Johnson & Johnson found that when people integrated short bursts of walking into a 6-hour day of simulated office work, they felt more energized than when they simply took bathroom breaks.

2016

Simon, Stacy. "New Website to Help Cancer Survivors Manage Health." American Cancer Society, October 26, 2016.

Springboard Beyond Cancer provides survivors with online tools to manage side effects from cancer treatment, cope with stress, improve healthy behaviors, communicate better with their health care teams, and ask for support from family and friends.

Snapp, Janet; Dori Klemanski. "Survivorship movement helps people learn to live well with cancer." STAT, October 11, 2016.

As cancer treatments improve, that number will grow, and millions more will have to learn to live a life forever altered by cancer. 

Singer, Dinah S., Tyler Jacks, Elizabeth Jaffee. "A U.S. “Cancer Moonshot” to accelerate cancer research." Science Magazine, September 9, 2016.

In January 2016 President Obama announced a “Cancer Moonshot” to “accelerate our understanding of cancer and its prevention, early detection, treatment, and cure”. A Blue Ribbon Panel (BRP) of scientific experts was convened to make recommendations to the National Cancer Advisory Board (NCAB), the adviser to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), on research opportunities uniquely poised for acceleration.

Donohue, Thomas J. "Business Community All In on Cancer Moon Shot." US Chamber of Commerce, August 15, 2016.

In 1969, America put a man on the Moon, a breathtaking achievement that many said couldn’t be done. The great challenge of our lifetime is putting an end to cancer. This single disease kills an estimated 600,000 people every year. As with the Moon Shot, the nation must come together again, overcome the odds, and achieve the impossible.

Richard Craver. "Study suggests graphic cigarette labels may get attention of smokers." Winston-Salem Journal, 6/6/2016.

Another study has determined graphic warning labels on cigarette packs may gain the attention of smokers better than current warning phrases, but not necessarily spur them to quit.

NCI Press Release. "Increased Physical Activity Associated with Lower Risk of 13 Types of Cancer." NIH: National Cancer Institute, May 16, 2016.

A new study of the relationship between physical activity and cancer has shown that greater levels of leisure-time physical activity were associated with a lower risk of developing 13 different types of cancer.

Nather, David; Dylan Scott. "FDA issues sweeping regulations for e-cigarettes for first time." STAT, May 5, 2016.

The FDA issued a sweeping set of tobacco rules that would regulate e-cigarettes for the first time.

Silverman, Rachel Emma. "Employees Get Apple Watch for $25 (But There's a Catch)." The Wall Street Journal, March 3, 2016.

Employees at a handful of companies will soon get a sweet deal: an Apple Watch for just $25. But there is a catch—they must meet monthly fitness goals over two years or pay the full price.

Rapaport, Lisa. "Smoking cessation pill no better than nicotine patches or lozenges." Reuters Health News, January 26, 2016.

Smoking cessation pills aren’t any better than nicotine patches or lozenges at helping people successfully quit, a U.S. study suggests. 

Goetzel, Ron. "Yet Another Reason to Build a Culture of Health at Your Company." Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, January 6, 2016.

For decades, proponents of workplace health promotion (wellness) programs have articulated the many factors justifying a business case for investment in these initiatives.  

2015

Sipek, Sarah. "Through Hell and Well." Workforce, December 25, 2015.

Bill Baun is the wellness officer at MD Anderson Cancer Center. He has been working in corporate wellness since its earliest days, and despite his own battle against cancer, his input continues to shape the wellness field today.

Benz, Edward J., Jr., MD. "How We Can Reduce Cancer Risk and Lower Health Costs." Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: Insight, December 18, 2015 | Updated May 22, 2017.

Yesterday, the Boston Board of Health approved a policy raising the minimum age for buying tobacco from 18 to 21. This is great news. As a former smoker, I know how easy it was to pick up the habit at age 18. I know how quickly nicotine becomes addictive, and I know how hard it was to finally quit smoking at age 37. As a physician and president of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, I see daily the heartbreak and havoc that tobacco wreaks on patients, families and health care costs.

Gittelson, Celia. "A Field in Motion: Fighting Cancer with Exercise." Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center - On Cancer, July 21, 2015.

Using an approach that spans basic and clinical science, exercise scientist Lee Jones, Director of the Cardio-Oncology Research Program (CORP), and his team are designing and testing the effects of individually prescribed exercise training to prevent or minimize the adverse cardiovascular side effects of cancer therapy. They’re also working to answer this potentially paradigm-shifting question: Can exercise be an effective treatment for cancer itself? Here, Dr. Jones talks about some of this work.

2014

Bryla, Jacy. "Cancer Presents Complex Workplace Challenges—According to IBI Research." Integrated Benefits Institute, March 26, 2014.

Cancer typically costs employers about $19,000 annually per 100 employees in lost work time and medical treatments. Lost work time and underperformance at work (presenteeism) due to cancer costs employers $10,000 per 100 workers—more than half of the total costs associated with cancer—and medical and pharmacy treatments cost about $9,100. Employees with cancer are absent 3.8 more days per year than workers without cancer, and also lose the equivalent of 1.8 more days per year to presenteeism.

Richtell, Matt. "Selling a Poison by the Barrel: Liquid Nicotine for E-Cigarettes." NY Times, March 23, 2014.

A dangerous new form of a powerful stimulant is hitting markets nationwide, for sale by the vial, the gallon and even the barrel. The drug is nicotine, in its potent, liquid form — extracted from tobacco and tinctured with a cocktail of flavorings, colorings and assorted chemicals to feed the fast-growing electronic cigarette industry.

Sherry, Mike. "KC employers urged to help fight cancer." Kansas Health Institute, February 13, 2014.

Fighting the nation’s second leading cause of death is a smart move for companies because it helps keep their workers fit and productive, a top U.S. health official with area connections told a business audience Tuesday at the Kauffman Foundation Conference Center.

The bad news for smokers goes well beyond CVS’s CVS, +1.06%   announcement Wednesday that it will stop selling all tobacco products. It turns out smoking cigarettes can be even deadlier than previously thought. And, according to a report released by the U.S. surgeon general, smokers could be paying for the added risks in more ways than one.

2013

Thorpe, Kenneth, written in partnership with Mary Grealy, President, Healthcare Leadership Council. "Value of Employee Wellness Programs." Huff Post Blog, March 18, 2013.

We’re writing this blog post because we have considerable experience, in our respective roles, working with employers who have put in place innovative wellness programs and are using metrics and their understanding of the unique nature of their respective workforces to continue fine-tuning these initiatives to strengthen their effectiveness. We believe it would be unfortunate if the idea that employee wellness programs bring no return on investment took hold and became conventional wisdom. These initiatives are critical weapons in the ongoing war against chronic disease.

Schroeder, Steven A., M.D. "New Evidence That Cigarette Smoking Remains the Most Important Health Hazard." New England Journal of Medicine, January 24, 2013.

Everyone knows cigarette smoking is bad for you. Most people in the United States assume that smoking is on its way out. But the grim reality is that smoking still exerts an enormous toll on the health of Americans, as documented in two articles in this issue of the Journal. Both articles review mortality trends over time for men and women according to smoking status, and both confirm that smoking remains a huge threat to the public's health.

2011

"The Road to Wellville." Texas CEO Magazine, July 24, 2011.

A C-Suite discourse on the complexities of employee wellness

2009

Berry, Leonard L., PhD. "Employers of Choice Attacking Cancer." September 1, 2009.

Remarks to the CEO Roundtable on Cancer September 2009.

Heinen, Luann and Helen Darling . "Addressing Obesity in the Workplace: The Role of Employers." National Business Group on Health, 2009.

This article describes the employer’s perspective on the cost impact of obesity, discusses current practices in employer-sponsored wellness and weight management programs, provides examples from U.S. companies illustrating key points of employers’ leverage and opportunities, and suggests policy directions to support the expansion of employers’ initiatives, especially for smaller employers.

2008

"Obesity Costs U.S. Companies as Much as $45 Billion a Year." The Conference Board Press Release, April 9, 2008.

The rate of obesity in the United States has doubled in the last 30 years, and those extra pounds weigh on companies’ bottom lines, according to a new report from The Conference Board. Today, 34 percent of American adults fit the definition of “obese.” Obese employees cost U.S. private employers an estimated $45 billion annually in medical expenditures and work loss. 

Fitch, Kathryn and Bruce Pyenson. "Taking Stock of Wellness." Benefits Quarterly, April 1, 2008.

This article describes the many ways different employers do wellness, the evidence base for wellness, how employers should target wellness candidates, and the elements of success and failure for wellness initiatives.

Weldon, William. "The CEO's Role in Fighting Cancer." Chief Executive Magazine, January 16, 2008.

Few actions in the tenure of a CEO are more personally rewarding than saving and improving human lives. It is one reason I am so proud to be part of a company like Johnson & Johnson, a leader in health care whose products and services touch the lives of over a billion people every day. It is also the reason I have been motivated to be part of the CEO Roundtable on Cancer.

Mercer, Lynn. "Fighting cancer head-on in the workplace." Cary Magazine, March / April 20018.

In 2001, Dr. Martin J. Murphy Jr. and 13 other chief executive officers met in the board room of GlaxoSmithKline with a mandate to be bold and venturesome. 

2007

"To Avoid the Big C, Stay Small." The Economist, November 1, 2007.

EVERY day there are new stories in the tabloids about the latest link, sometimes tenuous, sometimes contradictory, between cancer and some aspect of lifestyle. If this is a recipe for confusion, then the antidote is probably a weighty new tome from the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF). It is the most rigorous study so far on the links between food, physical activity and cancer—and sets out the important sources of risk.

Hirschman, Carolyn. "Going for Gold." Employee Benefit News, September 17, 2007.

At $1 an apple, there weren't many takers at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center's cafeterias. The center's wellness team got the price lowered to 75 cents to encourage diners to eat more fresh fruit. Count it as one small step in the battle against cancer.

Min, Shirley. "Tobacco Free Company a Big Hit." WNCN-TV, August 6, 2007.

Since going totally tobacco-free last month, Quintiles says its new policy has actually helped scores of employees put cigarettes out for good.

Ready, Tinker. "Can CEOs Cure Cancer?." Fast Company, July 24, 2007.

"If you are going to have a successful corporate program, it has to be directed from the top," says William Weldon, the CEO of Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ). He could be talking about cost-cutting initiatives or a new talent-management protocol. Instead, he's talking about cancer prevention.

"Companies Heed Bush's Call to Battle." Triangle Business Journal, July 16, 2007.

Robert Ingram is accustomed to important phone calls. As vice chairman of pharmaceuticals and former president of GlaxoSmithKline, he has for years made decisions involving large sums of money and affecting thousands of employees. But when Ingram received a call one day in 2001 with a special request from former President George H.W. Bush, he knew it was more than just business as usual. He also knew he couldn't say no."When the former president calls to ask you something, you know that you're going to say yes," Ingram says with a laugh.

2006

Vollmer, Sabine. "Wellness Conquers Cancer." News & Observer, December 7, 2006.

One by one, large Triangle employers are starting to urge their employees to eat more broccoli, start exercising and stop smoking.

It's all part of the CEO Cancer Gold StandardTM, a coordinated initiative corporate America has launched against cancer. Last year the disease cost the U.S. health care system about $210 billion, according to the National Institutes of Health. Quintiles Transnational is the latest local company trying to fulfill the rigorous requirements to receive Gold Standard accreditation. SAS, the Cary software company, is another.

Laws, Jerry. "Step Up to the CEO Cancer Gold Standard." Occupational Health and Safety, May 1, 2006.

The CEO Cancer Gold Standard focuses on five critical areas that help accredited organizations maintain a culture encouraging healthy lifestyles and providing support when a cancer diagnosis is made. 

Zook, Tony. "The ROI of Wellness." Forbes, April 24, 2006.

It should come as no surprise that healthy employees boost a company’s bottom line. They experience less sick time, take fewer disability days and suffer lesser risk of premature deaths. According to the Centers for Disease Control, more than 75% of employers’ health care costs and productivity losses are related to employee lifestyle choices. And a $1 investment in wellness programs saves $3 in health care costs, according to the Wellness Council of America.