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Gold Standard Articles of Interest for Public Sector Organizations

2019

Recently, I was approached on London Bridge by an attractive sales woman with samples of what looked like sweet containers. On closer inspection, they were not confectionary, but instead turned out to be nicotine vape samples. I was not asked if I was over 18 (I look young for someone in their mid-20s), and I was not asked if I was trying to quit smoking or had a previous history of substance abuse. I politely declined.

The marketing for nicotine vapes around the world has been, by and large, poorly regulated, and it is commonplace in London to see teenagers with their hands on vapes blowing pillows of smoke. While 10 years ago it would have been more common to see teenagers experimenting with their first cigarettes under the cover of trees and park benches, the seemingly more accessible nature of vapes has started to replace this underage rite of passage with something more blatant. In the United States, the Federal Court has launched an investigation into Juul, a large nicotine vape producer. The global regulation of vaping, which contains nicotine, a substance found to be nearly as addictive as heroin, should be more common than it is now.

The Food and Drug Administration has evaluated the effectiveness of its youth anti-smoking campaign. Short answer: it worked!

Researchers from the government agency and nonprofit RTI have found that awareness campaign The Real Cost prevented between 380,000 and 587,000 teens from starting to smoke, according to the study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine

Frieden, Joyce. "Vaping Companies Marketing to Teens, House Panel Told." MedPage Today, July 24, 2019.

WASHINGTON -- Children and teenagers should not be vaping, House members and witnesses agreed at a hearing Wednesday, but they disagreed on what government should focus on regarding e-cigarettes such as those made by JUUL: their potential as smoking-cessation aids for adults, or their role in creating a new generation of nicotine addicts.

"Public Health Plagued By Preemption." American for Nonmokers' Rights Foundation, February 14, 2019.

At ANR, we are no strangers to preemption. This tricky tactic was cultivated and perfected by the tobacco industry. We know the industry never quits, so we have never stopped tracking and defending against preemptive strikes.

Reference Refresh

A little rusty on the vocabulary? According to the National Policy and Legal Analysis Network, preemption occurs when a “higher” level of government eliminates or limits the authority of a “lower” level of government to regulate a certain issue. Preemption can take different forms: either explicitly spelled out in a statute, or implied, which is murkier and based on legislative intent. Implied preemption can result in a legal challenge to interpret what the law says, which is why our model language always recommends expressly stating that state laws do not preempt local action. An example of this industry interference trick is in the fact Pittsburgh, PA, Nashville, TN, and Oklahoma City are barred from enacting local smokefree laws.

Facing youth e-cigarette epidemic, American Lung Association calls for federal government, states to put in place proven tobacco control policies to protect kids, save lives.

2018

Flaherty, Ann; Quinn Owen. "Epidemic' of dangerous youth e-cigarette, vaping use, surgeon general declares." abc News, December 18, 2018.

The U.S. surgeon general on Tuesday issued a strong warning against e-cigarette use by young people, called it "unsafe" in any form and termed vaping an "epidemic."

The Gazette Editorial Board. "We must address teen vaping craze." Colorado Springs Gazette, December 19, 2018.

Teen consumption of nicotine vapor throughout the country rose 10 percent in the past 30 days over a similar period a year ago. Tuesday’s announcement by the National Institute for Drug Abuse marks the largest increase of any substance use in the agency’s 43 years of tracking.

The U.S. Surgeon General issued an advisory Tuesday urging new local restrictions including taxes and indoor vaping bans to combat youth e-cigarette use, a pivotal development given the office's global stature on tobacco enforcement. 

"Surgeon General’s e-cigarette advisory brings necessary attention to ‘epidemic’ in youth." University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, December 18, 2018.

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center supports the United States Surgeon General’s actions to inform youth, parents, teachers and health professionals about the “epidemic” rates of e-cigarette use among youth and the associated health risks for young people. In order to protect the health of future generations, MD Anderson is committed to programs and actions that prevent teens and young adults from using these products.

Young, Kelly. "Teen Nicotine Vaping Doubles in Single Year." New England Journal of Medicine, December 17, 2018.

Twice as many adolescents reported vaping nicotine in 2018 as in 2017, according to correspondence in the New England Journal of Medicine. The authors say it's the largest absolute increase ever recorded in the 44-year history of the study, which surveys 8th through 12th graders about substance use.

Gov. John Hickenlooper took new steps Friday to curb the use of e-cigarettes by teenagers in Colorado, signing an executive order that, among other things, directs state regulators to increase checks of retailers to make sure they are not selling the devices to underage shoppers.

Ghosh, Tista. "Vaping is tobacco’s new guise to target Colorado kids." The Denver Post, August 3, 2018.

Think tobacco use has disappeared as a threat to our children’s health? It hasn’t. About one in three Colorado high school students are using nicotine. Most of them don’t smoke cigarettes or use chew tobacco, they’re doing something new. It’s called vaping.

2017

Communities with strong smoke-free workplace laws have lower lung cancer rates than those with no smoke-free laws, researchers report. The new study was conducted in Kentucky, which has one of the highest lung cancer rates in the United States.

2014

Viehbacher, Christopher; Martin Murphy, DMedSc, PhD, FASCO. "Colorado has taken a bold step." The Gazette, March 23, 2014.

Personal lifestyle is usually risky territory for leaders even when there is compelling medical evidence supporting public action and policy. Eliminating tobacco use and promoting physical activity and healthy nutrition are important ways to prevent disease and improve health - it is evidence based.

2012

Viehbacher, Christopher; Martin Murphy, DMedSc, PhD, FASCO. "Encouraging, lauding steps to reduce cancer risks." The Oklahoman, March 18, 2012.

Public officials find it difficult to lead when personal lifestyle is involved, including choices about smoking, exercise and diet. Yet such prevention initiatives remain important levers for reducing disease. That's why we should be especially proud of Oklahoma's “CEO,” Gov. Mary Fallin, and her decision to prohibit tobacco use on state property.